/ Monday, January 30th, 2012

by Liz Driscoll

Welcome back, our wonderful readers!  Thanks for such thoughtful answers to last week’s questions!  Jim Korkis himself is following along and has posted in the blog comments–so be sure to check back often and see what others–including the author himself!–have to say!  And, as always, feel free to answer as many or as few of this week’s questions as you like–but most of all, enjoy the camaraderie!

Without further ado… here are the questions for this week!  Happy reading!!

Gospel According to Walt

Question 1: When you look at the Norway Pavilion Stave Church and the Morocco Pavilion, do you see them as religious buildings or solely as architectural examples?

Question 2: Pg. 61 Reading Walt’s essay “My Faith”, “All prayer… has one thing in common, as I see it: a supplication for strength and inspiration to carry on the best human impulses which should bind us all together for a better world.”  How do you think prayer in Walt’s life influenced the parks as we see them today?

Walt and DeMolay

Question 3: Pg. 67 When you read about DeMolay what other organizations does it make you think of that foster leadership today?

Question 4: Do you think that Disney internships and college programs are examples of fostering leadership?

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

Question 5: Pg. 78 Walt said that his paper route helped him learn about responsibility, respect, and customer satisfaction.  He also thought it could benefit other boys IF “he is not too young and the task is not too burdensome”

Question 6: Do you think Walt was referring to his own route at age nine when he mentioned the work being burdensome?

Question 7: How much of Elias’ insistence on quality of delivery crossed over into Walt’s plans for Disneyland and Walt Disney World?

Return to Marceline 1956

Question 8: Pg. 88 Did you find it amusing or odd that the children of Marceline sang “The Mickey Mouse Club Song” as the show was not televised in their town?

Question 9: Pg. 90 Do you see a place for “Walt’s Boyhood Farm” in the Disney parks today?  In what park would you place the farm?

Question 10: Pg. 90 Why do you think Walt so wanted the replica of the Marceline barn in his backyard?

Walt’s 30th Wedding Anniversary

Question 11: What event would you like to throw if you could have the Mark Twain Riverboat and Golden Horseshoe Saloon as your party venue?

Question 12: Diane talks about how much Walt enjoyed that night.  If you were there, what would you have said to Walt about his anniversary and his park?


Liz Driscoll went to Walt Disney World for the first time when she was five years old, though her Disney passion began seven years ago.  She has visited Walt Disney World about twelve times in the past seven years.  In the non-Disney world, she is a teacher who enjoys bringing a little bit of pixie dust in the classroom each day!

One Response to "WDW Radio Disney Book Club: “The Vault of Walt” by Jim Korkis Questions – Week 2"

  1. DisneyDragons says:

    Q1. I see the buildings as both examples of the architecture and the religious history of the countries

  2. Brandon says:

    Where is everybody this week? I hope a few more people join in.

    1. For the most part the buildings in World Showcase are meant to be architectural representations of buildings in that respective country. The fact that some of them are replicas of religious buildings just shows how important buildings like this are in these countries.

    2. To Walt, prayer was supposed to be a way to unify people. As a result prayer hasn’t had a large influence on the parks today other than as a way to bring people of all cultures and backgrounds together in one place with their families. I don’t believe there are any churches or places of worship on Disney property.

    3. For some reason the first thing that comes to mind is boy scouts and girl guides. Some schools in my area use something called the “Future Aces Creed” as a way to encourage students to show leadership and achieve their goals.

    4. When I worked at WDW I believe Disney had a special program designed for college students aimed at fostering leadership skills. From my personal experiences with the International Program and College Program here are my thoughts. Although Disney promotes and encourages traits such as leadership, most of the people that I encountered were there for the chance to meet others from all over the world and mainly to have a good time.

    5+6. I think Walt did believe his route was burdensome for a kid of his age but would never complain or question his father. I don’t think nine year olds should be faced with burdensome work and thankfully today most young children in our country aren’t forced to work. Unfortunately during the time Walt as growing up (and still today in many poor countries) young children are forced to work in order to support their families.

    7. Our morals and values are ingrained starting at a young age. Elias’ insistence on quality more than likely has impacted the Disney parks and what they are today. Every time we go to another theme park at some point I always say “Well it isn’t Disney!” Thanks to Elias’ high standards the Disney parks and resorts provide quality entertainment with attention to detail like nowhere else.

    8. I think that just goes to show how the town felt about Walt. What I wonder is how they were able to get the information to learn the song since the transfer of information thanks to technology wasn’t available to them.

    9. The best place to display Walt’s boyhood farm would be in One Man’s Dream at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. They could perhaps also place it at the Animal Kingdom and use it as some type of children’s play area.

    10. Marceline always felt like home to Walt and he was a very sentimental person. I think this also ties into his love of miniatures and trains as Walt was a collector especially when it related to things from his childhood.

    11. I would have loved to have my wedding there but it would also be a great venue for a Super Bowl party.

    12. When I think of what I would ask Walt Disney, so many things come to mind. More than likely I wouldn’t even know what to ask him. Perhaps I would ask him to build a Disney theme park in Canada. Maybe I would ask him something about where he saw the park going in the next 5-10 years. Or what does it take to make a marriage work?

  3. 1937Fan says:

    #4 – Perhaps, I didn’t work a Disney internship or college program, but I did work at Disneyland during my college years. And while I may have picked up some leadership skills, I really think the more valuable lessons were in team work and customer service (and tolerance – for having to give directions to the restroom 50 times a day).

    #5/6 – I think it’s a good sentiment for kids to feel responsibility, respect, and customer satisfaction. In terms of not too young or not too burdensome – kids today have to deal with homework, sports, practices, and all kinds of other schedules. Having a paper route could still fit in for older kids, but a kid still needs time to be a kid. Not to mention getting up that early would be tough on many. I can’t imagine a nine year old today having a paper route.

    #8 – I think that learning the song to sing speaks to the importance of the event for Marceline and the widespread effect of the Mickey Mouse club. I’ve had the opportunity to visit their museum and town, and they have great stories to tell and are very proud of their history – it’s an enjoyable place.

    #9 – Walt’s Boyhood Farm could work Fronterland – like the Big Thunder Ranch area in Disneyland. Magic Kingdom and Disneyland certainly feature other iconic American times and lives.

    # 10 – I think as people grow older, they grow nostalgic for the things they associate with their childhood. My Aunts are now in their 70’s and were crushed to find their grandparents’ home had become a parking lot. If they had the means and land, they would rebuild it in moment. I think a lot of us would revisit or recreate our childhood spot if we could.

    #11 – I’d host any event, just getting to use them would be a blast! I love watching the Disneyland footage where they have the bands on the Mark Twain – how fun would that be? (I’m thinking the footage is of Louis Armstrong on the Mark Twain on one of the Walt Disney Treasure DVDs –Disney Land After Dark?) Birthday party, Anniversary party, New Year’s Eve, or Earth Day Celebration – whatever it is, I’m in!

  4. Debbie says:

    Gospel According to Walt
    Question 1: When you look at the Norway Pavilion Stave Church and the Morocco Pavilion, do you see them as religious buildings or solely as architectural examples?
    More architectural examples than religious buildings, mostly due to my rushing past them to get to the delicious food in their pavilions!

    Question 2: Pg. 61 Reading Walt’s essay “My Faith”, “All prayer… has one thing in common, as I see it: a supplication for strength and inspiration to carry on the best human impulses which should bind us all together for a better world.” How do you think prayer in Walt’s life influenced the parks as we see them today?
    Prayer reminds us that we can’t live on our own strength and that there is something bigger than ourselves. Walt experienced much hardship, as a child and as an adult, so must have learned early on that he couldn’t always rely on his own strength. Also, he seemed to easily grasp the idea that he was impacting the future, which compelled him to accept only the very best in creativity and quality. His work in the parks reflect those ideals and I am touched that he understood he could not do it all himself.

    Walt and DeMolay
    Question 3: Pg. 67 When you read about DeMolay what other organizations does it make you think of that foster leadership today?
    Boy Scouts of America.

    Question 4: Do you think that Disney internships and college programs are examples of fostering leadership?
    I hope so. These programs are highly competitive which is impressive considering that such a combination of low pay and long hours would be a turn-off to many. Managers have a great opportunity to foster strong mentoring relationships with these CPers and I do know that the interns and CPers are eligible for management positions after a certain amount of time. There is a lot of tremendous leadership potential in these programs.

    Extra! Extra! Read All About It!
    Question 5: Pg. 78 Walt said that his paper route helped him learn about responsibility, respect, and customer satisfaction. He also thought it could benefit other boys IF “he is not too young and the task is not too burdensome”
    Question 6: Do you think Walt was referring to his own route at age nine when he mentioned the work being burdensome?
    This was a sad chapter to read – I kept thinking of that 9 year old boy getting up so early to do such a hard work and missing out on lots of fun kid stuff. This was a lot more common back then, I suspect, but it had to have been overwhelming at times, especially since he was so much younger than his brothers and didn’t have someone his own age with whom he could share the burden. So, yes, he might have been referring to the paper route as being burdensome.

    Question 7: How much of Elias’ insistence on quality of delivery crossed over into Walt’s plans for Disneyland and Walt Disney World?
    For a company as large as Disney, their customer service is consistently stellar. For that culture to have been borne of Elias’ strict customer service policies must have been influential indeed – wow!

    Return to Marceline 1956
    Question 8: Pg. 88 Did you find it amusing or odd that the children of Marceline sang “The Mickey Mouse Club Song” as the show was not televised in their town?
    Clever – good job, kids!

    Question 9: Pg. 90 Do you see a place for “Walt’s Boyhood Farm” in the Disney parks today? In what park would you place the farm?
    Perhaps in the Land Pavilion at Epcot? As a separate tour to keep the human/animal interaction more regulated.

    Question 10: Pg. 90 Why do you think Walt so wanted the replica of the Marceline barn in his backyard?
    He always remembered his roots and, despite his harsh upbringing, seemed to appreciate the lessons learned from them. The barn would be a physical reminder of those roots.

    Walt’s 30th Wedding Anniversary
    Question 11: What event would you like to throw if you could have the Mark Twain Riverboat and Golden Horseshoe Saloon as your party venue?
    The WDW Radio 5 Year Anniversary Show, of course!

    Question 12: Diane talks about how much Walt enjoyed that night. If you were there, what would you have said to Walt about his anniversary and his park?
    I would have liked to speak to Lilian to tell her that all of the sacrifices she had to make in sharing her husband with the rest of the world were not in vain.

  5. Sherri says:

    1. I think that the Stave church and the Morocco pavilion are definately there more for the architecture.However, these buildings also represent that countries culture and I do feel that an important part of both of these countries cultures is their religious beliefs.

    2. Based on Walts essay, “All prayer… has one thing in common, as I see it: a supplication for strength and inspiration to carry on the best human impulses which should bind us all together for a better world.” it sounds like his ideas for EPCOT were very much influenced by his belief in prayer. A world bound together based on strength and inspiration is what EPCOT is all about.

    4. I definately think that the intrernship program is an example of fostering leadership. What better way to learn about being a leader in business and in life that by working with such a well repected company as Disney. I wish I had known more about the program when I was in college and I am encouraging my daughter to go into the program when she gets into college.

    5. I definately think Walt was talking about his own route. I think that kids having responsiblity is a good thing. Look at what it did for Walt and his work ethic. However, it does seem that Walts route was way to strenous for a 9 year old. Work and chores are great for children in moderation.

    7. Yes, Elias’ influence can be seen in the Disney parks. Parents influence their childrens ideals and should teach their children that they should strive for the best.

    8. I don’t think it was odd that they sang the song. Usually when a visitor comes you want to do everything you can to entertain or impress them.

    9..Maybe they could put a replica of Walts Marceline home in One Mans Dream. That would make sence.

    10. Walt probably wanted a replica of his Marceline farm in his back yard because he had such fond memories of that time and those memories inspired him. He probably wanted to share that time with his family.

    11. I would love to give my daughter a 16th birthday party there.

  6. erin says:

    1. I view the Stave Church and Morocco Pavilion as architectural examples.

    2. Walt Disney’s prayer ideology is extended into the parks as one of the underlying themes of the parks is world unity for a better, stronger future.

    3. Masons

    4. I believe both the Disney Internships and College Programs help foster leadership skills by laying the building blocks of Disney leadership as well as providing leadership examples.

    5. I think that Walt was mentioning in passing his own paper route. I do not believe Walt whole heartedly felt his route was burdensome all of the time since he does mention how accomplished he felt earning his own money and the fact
    that he gained important life experiences (responsibility, sense of worth).

    6. Excellent customer service and the idea of exceeding customer’s expectations was instilled in Walt Disney at an early age by his father who required Roy and Walt to deliver papers differently from the competition (place them inside the doors).

    7. This is just a great example of how prolific The Mickey Mouse Club was during that time.

    8. Magic Kingdom – Frontierland

    9. Marceline represented Walt’s childhood. (nostalgic memories)

    10. A Disneyland Anniversary Party or birthday party with close friends.

  7. Jim Korkis says:

    Jim Korkis here! In another lifetime, I was a public school teacher at a Middle School (grades 6-8) in Southern California. Some of these questions almost seem like the questions I would come up with for some of my students (I taught three English classes a day in addition to a Drama Class and a Speech class) for books they would have to read.

    As far as I am concerned, you all get “A”s. No extra credit required!

    I have been very impressed not only by the thoughtfulness of the answers but how the answers are so well expressed.

    This discussion has really inspired me to work harder on my next book! Thank you all!

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