Your Walt Disney World Information Station
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
Miscellaneous Discuss Sorry, no Tiggers allowed. in the News & Rumors forums; Interesting fact I thought I'd pass along: All the tigers at AK are females. They are not allowed to breed because they are "hybrids" of different species....
  1. #1
    Jiminy Cricket's Avatar
    Jiminy Cricket is offline Ultimate Park "Hopper"
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    1,015; 2 miles from WDW in Central Indiana; Windermere FL
    Posts
    4,702

    Sorry, no Tiggers allowed.

    Interesting fact I thought I'd pass along:

    All the tigers at AK are females. They are not allowed to breed because they are "hybrids" of different species.
    Lord High Keeper of the Knowledge of Right and Wrong, Counselor in Moments of Temptation, and Guide along the Straight and Narrow Path and Oldest Active DWT/WDW Radio Member

    DL: 1955* (1); WDW: 1977* (2), 1980* (2), 1985* (3), 1989* (3), 1996 (ASMu-3), 1999 (ASMo-3), 2000 (ASMu-2/PO-2), 2001 (ASMu-5), 2002 (ASMu-5), 2003 (ASMo-5), 2004* (8), 2004 (ASMo-8), 2005 (PC-10), 2006* (15), 2007* (20), 2008* (22), 2009* (26), 2010* (27), 2011* (32), 2012* (39), 2013* (36), 2013* (15), 2013* (9), 2013* (13), 2014* (40) Total Trips/Days = 26/353

    *Off Property

  2. #2
    pezheadval's Avatar
    pezheadval is offline A-Ticket holder
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    16
    Very Interesting!

  3. #3
    tiggerwannabe's Avatar
    tiggerwannabe is offline ~Disney is my Therapy~
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NJ - 1030 miles North of Orlando
    Posts
    1,631


    Whew! I was worried for a minute there!
    °O° cj/nj °O°



    °O°The Key to Happiness is Self Delusion°O°





  4. #4
    DisneyPrincess2's Avatar
    DisneyPrincess2 is offline B-Ticket Holder
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    S.C
    Posts
    77
    i have never heard that before thanks for sharing this.
    The Dreams Of Tomorrow Start With the Dreams Of Today

  5. #5
    DisneyPrincess2's Avatar
    DisneyPrincess2 is offline B-Ticket Holder
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    S.C
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyPrincess2
    i have never heard that before thanks for sharing this.
    even though this was posted last year still very interesting
    The Dreams Of Tomorrow Start With the Dreams Of Today

  6. #6
    GaRain's Avatar
    GaRain is offline I love a guy who can make me laugh!
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Right here!!!
    Posts
    14,183
    I did not know this. Are they Ligers?
    Nothing to countdown to, so just smile and be happy everyday!




  7. #7
    MainStreet, USA's Avatar
    MainStreet, USA is offline I'm walking right down the middle of Main Street, USA!
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Southington, CT/Daytona Beach, FL/ Main Street, USA!
    Posts
    2,040
    I knew they were all female, but I didn't know they weren't allowed to breed. (well, obviously if they were all female they couldn't breed... but you know what I mean. They could maybe bring the boy tigers over from the cross-town school for the Holiday Mixer and they all have a party. ok, imagination running wild, i'll stop now.)

    GaRain, I'm not a kitty expert (my gf would be a much better person to ask... she loves big cats, but tigers even moreso than the others), but I've seen a show on TV that had something about Ligers, and I can tell you that those cats were HUGE... something about the lack of a growth inhibitor or something because of the male/female lion/tiger combo used, although i suppose that also implys that the result woulnd't have been the same if they'd switched up which species of cat was the male and which was the female. So I don't know for sure. But other than size, they were also distinct because they were pale in color (like a lion) but also had faint stripes (like a tiger). I can tell you with almost certainty that the tigers at DAK are 100% tiger, but my guess for the sake of having an example is that they are maybe part Bengal tiger and part Siberian tiger. Both still very much a tiger, but different types. I don't really know too much about the differences between the two, but I know there are a couple. it's kind of like humans of two different races having a child. The baby would still be human, but will be part of both races. The Liger thing is a more drastic mix. That's more like mating a human and a chimpanzee (I know it's weird, but it's a fellow primate, and off the top of my head I thought might be possible)... the result would be unique, and probably not either a human or chimp, but (ooh, i've always wanted to use this phrase...) "a whole 'nother animal" instead.
    -Don-
    Your heart can just take wing,
    You can live out all your dreams...
    ...it's time to Remember the Magic!
    Yo Ho, Yo Ho, A Pilot's Life for Me...

  8. #8
    trickster's Avatar
    trickster is offline Hakuna Matata!!... It means no worries!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lancaster - NW England
    Posts
    45,918

    Talking


    Wow!! It's something that you don't think about!! But, when you do think about it, it makes sense!!
    Rich

    "Most of my life I have done what I wanted to do. I have had fun on the job.
    I have never been able to confine that fun to office hours." ~ Walt Disney

  9. #9
    4Mickey's Avatar
    4Mickey is offline "But why is the Rum gone?"
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Sailin' under me Jolly Roger
    Posts
    3,872
    I've seen a Liger. They had a travelling exhibit of endangered Tigers in my area a couple of years ago. They had baby tigers, & big tigers. They would rescue them from dumb people who wanted them as pets then couldn't keep them. Anyway, they also had a Liger which was face to face with me while he was on all 4s... I'm 6 feet tall!!! It was the biggest cat I'd ever seen! Very beautiful, but demanding of respect all the same.
    "What ARRRRGH you doing?"

    "What are you doing?"
    "No, What ARRRRGH you doing?"
    Cap'n Jack lives again!
    "I'll try anything once or twice, that's the kind of mouse I am"

  10. #10
    DissyLove's Avatar
    DissyLove is offline Wendy's real. I've seen her, so don't even start with me.
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Back in Michigan.....
    Posts
    5,241
    Interesting. Wonder if the lady tigers spend time fighting about who takes the longest shower or who spends more time in the mirror....
    I am in need of some Disney magic!!

  11. #11
    SnwhtNdwrfs's Avatar
    SnwhtNdwrfs is offline Dancing with the dwarfs!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Being entertained by the voices in my head
    Posts
    45,929
    So what species is Tigger? Does anybody know the latin on him?

    Maybe Disneious stripieous? Or Bouncous alotous?


  12. #12
    Koda is offline C-Ticket Holder
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    I'm from Pittsburgh, but live in Tampa
    Posts
    148
    I know the spanish... Tigger er es tu?
    Koda

    If we can dream it, we can do it! ~ Walt Disney

  13. #13
    Jiminy Cricket's Avatar
    Jiminy Cricket is offline Ultimate Park "Hopper"
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    1,015; 2 miles from WDW in Central Indiana; Windermere FL
    Posts
    4,702
    There are nine subspecies of tiger, three of which are extinct and one of which is almost certain to become so in the near future. Their historical range (severely diminished today) ran through Russia, Siberia, Iran, Afghanistan, India, China and southeast Asia, including the Indonesian islands. These are the surviving subspecies, in descending order of wild population:


    Siberian Tiger


    • The Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Amur, Manchurian or North China tiger, is confined almost totally to a very restricted part of eastern Russia where it is now protected. There are less than 400 of these tigers in the wild, and many populations are likely to no longer be genetically viable, subject to potentially catastrophic inbreeding. By far the largest subspecies, with males exceeding lengths of 12 feet (3.7 m) and weights of 850 pounds (390 kg), the Siberian Tiger is also noted for its thick coat, distinguished by a paler golden hue and a smaller number of stripes. The Siberian tiger is the most powerful of all living cats. [1]

    • The South China Tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis), also known as the Amoy or Xiamen tiger, is the most critically endangered subspecies of tiger, and will almost certainly become extinct. It seems likely that the last known wild South Chinese tiger was shot and killed in 1994, and no live tigers have been seen in their natural habitat for the last 20 years. In 1959, Mao Zedong declared the tiger to be a pest, and numbers quickly fell from about 4,000 to approximately 200 in 1976. In 1977 the Chinese government reversed the law, and banned the killing of wild tigers, but this appears to have been too late to save the subspecies. There are currently 59 known captive Chinese tigers, all within China, but these are known to be descended from only 6 animals. Thus, the genetic diversity required to maintain the subspecies no longer exists, making its eventual extinction very likely.

    • Indochinese Tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), also called Corbett's tiger, is found in Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. Estimates of its population vary between 1,200 to 1,800, but it seems likely that the number is in the lower part of the range. The largest current population is in Malaysia, where illegal poaching is strictly controlled, but all existing populations are at extreme risk from habitat fragmentation and inbreeding. In Vietnam, almost three-quarters of the tigers killed provide stock for Chinese pharmacies. Also the tigers are seen by poor natives as a resource through which they can ease poverty.

    Panthera tigris sumatran subspecies resting.


    • The Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The wild population is estimated at between 400 and 500 animals, occurring predominantly in the island’s five national parks. Recent genetic testing has revealed the presence of unique genetic markers, indicating that it may develop into a separate species, if it is not made extinct. This has led to suggestions that Sumatran Tigers should have greater priority for conservation than any other subspecies. Habitat destruction is the main threat to the existing tiger population (logging continues even in the supposedly protected national parks), but 66 tigers were recorded as being shot and killed between 1998 and 2000—nearly 20% of the total population.

    Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)


    • The Bengal Tiger or the Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is largely found in the Sundarbans, a national forest of Bangladesh and of West Bengal, India. According to recent counts in a joint effort of the Bangladesh and Indian governments, there are about 800 tigers in this area. The Bengal Tiger is also found in Nepal and Bhutan. It is the national animal of both Bangladesh and India. Even though this is the most 'common' tiger, these tigers are under severe pressure from both habitat reduction and from poaching. However there is a debate that there aren't as many tigers in the sunderbans, but are more sparsley populated over India, Nepal and Bangladesh.

    • The Malayan Tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni), exclusively found in the southern (Malaysian) part of the Malay Peninsula, which until 2004 wasn't considered a subspecies in its own right. The new classification came about after a study by Luo et al from the Laboratory of Genomic Diversity Study, part of the National Cancer Institute, US. Recent counts showed there are 600-800 tigers in the wild, making it the largest tiger population other than the Bengal Tiger. The Malayan Tiger is a national icon in Malaysia, appearing on its coat of arms and in logos of Malaysian institutions such as Maybank.
    Lord High Keeper of the Knowledge of Right and Wrong, Counselor in Moments of Temptation, and Guide along the Straight and Narrow Path and Oldest Active DWT/WDW Radio Member

    DL: 1955* (1); WDW: 1977* (2), 1980* (2), 1985* (3), 1989* (3), 1996 (ASMu-3), 1999 (ASMo-3), 2000 (ASMu-2/PO-2), 2001 (ASMu-5), 2002 (ASMu-5), 2003 (ASMo-5), 2004* (8), 2004 (ASMo-8), 2005 (PC-10), 2006* (15), 2007* (20), 2008* (22), 2009* (26), 2010* (27), 2011* (32), 2012* (39), 2013* (36), 2013* (15), 2013* (9), 2013* (13), 2014* (40) Total Trips/Days = 26/353

    *Off Property

  14. #14
    Jiminy Cricket's Avatar
    Jiminy Cricket is offline Ultimate Park "Hopper"
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    1,015; 2 miles from WDW in Central Indiana; Windermere FL
    Posts
    4,702
    Liger
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.



    Example of a liger


    The liger is a cross (a hybrid) between a male lion and a female tiger. It is therefore a member of genus Panthera. There is no scientific name assigned to this hybrid, but Panthera leo X tigris has been suggested. It looks like a giant lion with diffused stripes. Like tigers (and unlike lions), ligers like swimming.

    A cross between a male tiger and a female lion is called a tigon.

    Known ligers are human influenced, either by deliberate human intervention, or by humans putting lions and tigers in enclosed spaces together. In natural conditions tigers and lions generally do not inhabit the same territory - the two species used to coexist in the wild in India, but inhabited different regions. Today in India, lions exist only in the Gir forest. There have been no confirmed reports of natural interbreeding, though there are longstanding claims that this has happened.

    According to "The Tiger, Symbol of Freedom" (Nicholas Courtney, editor): Rare reports have been made of tigresses mating with lions in the wild.

    Large size

    Ligers grow much larger than tigers or lions and it is believed this is because female lions transmit a growth-inhibiting gene to their descendants to balance the growth-promoting gene transmitted by male lions (this gene is due to competitive mating strategies in lions). A male lion needs to be large to successfully defend the pride from other roaming male lions and pass on his genes; also, in prides with multiple male adult lions, a male's cubs need to be bigger than the competing males for the best chance of survival. Thus, his genes favor larger offspring. A lioness, however, will have up to 5 cubs, and a cub is typically one of many being cared for in a pride with many other lions. As such, it has a relatively high survival rate, and need not be huge as it will not need to look after itself very quickly. Smaller cubs are more easily cared for and fed and are less strain on the pride; hence, the inhibiting gene developed.

    Male tigers do not compete for status and mates in the way lions do; a tigress only mates with one tiger when in season, so a tiger does not have the same genetic predisposition to produce large competing offspring. Also, a tigress typically has fewer cubs, and those have a much lower survival rate due to the tiger's solitary nature, so being large and growing quickly are an advantage; there is no need for a growth inhibitor. Being the offspring of a male lion and female tiger, the liger inherits the growth-promoting gene unfettered by a growth-inhibiting gene and typically grows larger than either animal; this is called growth dysplasia. Some male ligers grow sparse manes.

    Because of the impossibility of a gene being inherited from only females, there is a competing hypothesis. This untested hypothesis holds that the lion's sperm is damaged somehow during fertilization and that a growth-inhibiting gene is typically destroyed. Female tigons and female ligers both possess a tiger X chromosome and a lion X chromosome, yet only the female ligers will grow large, which suggests that either something happens to alter the genes or the cause of the growth dysplasia lies at least partially outside of genetic.

    Another possible hypothesis is that the growth dysplasia results from the interaction between lion genes and tiger womb environment. The tiger produces a hormone that sets the fetal liger on a pattern of growth that does not end throughout its life. The hormonal hypothesis is that the cause of the male liger's growth is its sterility - essentially, the male liger remains in the pre-pubertal growth phase. This is not upheld by behavioural evidence - despite being sterile, many male ligers become sexually mature and mate with females. In addition, female ligers also attain great size but are fertile.



    Fertility

    Known male ligers have all been sterile. Many, however, reach sexual maturity and copulate with lionesses, tigresses or with female hybrids. A. H. Bryden reported in "Animal Life and the World of Nature" (1902), Already, I understand, Mr Hagenbeck has mated the big lion-tiger hybrid with other pure-bred felines, but with no result. This referred to the liger bred in 1897.

    Female ligers are often fertile and can be mated to a tiger resulting in ti-liger offspring or to a lion resulting in li-liger offspring. A behavioural research program in the USA has bred a female ti-liger called Lady Kali. At 2 years old she weighed 400 lb (180 kg).



    Vocalisation and behaviour

    Ligers may exhibit emotional or behavioural conflicts due to their mixed ancestry.

    They inherit different or mixed vocabularies (tigers "chuff", lions roar). G Peters included several hybrids (liger, tigon, leopon, leguar) in his "Comparative Investigation of Vocalisation in Several Felids" published in German in Spixiana-Supplement, 1978; (1): 1-206.

    They may inherit conflicting behavioural traits from the parent species. Ligers may exhibit conflicts between the social habits of the lion and the solitary habits of the tiger. Their lion heritage wants them to form social groups, but their tiger heritage urges them to be intolerant of company. Opponents of deliberate hybridization say this causes confusion and depression for the animals, especially after sexual maturity. How much of their behaviour is due to conflicting instincts and how much is due to abnormal hormones or the stress of captive conditions is not fully known.



    Colors

    Ligers have a tiger-like striping pattern on a lion-like tawny background. In addition they may inherit rosettes from the lion parent (lion cubs are rosetted and some adults retain faint markings). These markings may be black, dark brown or sandy. The background color may be correspondingly tawny, sandy or golden. In common with tigers, their underparts are paler. The actual pattern and color depends on which subspecies the parents were and on the way in which the genes interact in the offspring.

    White tigers have been crossed with lions to produce "white" (actually pale golden) ligers. In theory white tigers could be crossed with white lions to produce white, very pale or even stripeless ligers. A black liger would require both a melanistic tiger and a melanistic lion as parents. Very few melanistic tigers have ever been recorded, most being due to excessive markings (pseudo-melanism or abundism) rather than true melanism. No reports of black lions have ever been substantiated. The blue or Maltese tiger is now unlikely to exist, making gray or blue ligers an impossibility.



    Recent ligers

    A liger named Hobbs lives at Sierra Safari Zoo, Reno, Nevada, USA. He is the offspring of an African lion and a Bengal tigress. According to the zoo, "He roars like a lion and swims like a tiger. He's definitely all cat. He likes to play, and for all his incredible bulk he moves just as silently as any other cat". He is estimated to weigh about 450 kilograms (approximately 1000 pounds), about twice the average for male Siberian tigers, the largest non-extinct, naturally-occurring member of family Felidae.

    Shambala Preserve has a liger called Patrick who weighs an estimated 800 pounds (360 kg). He has a golden coat with slightly darker golden stripes and a modest mane that resembles an overdeveloped tiger ruff. Patrick was born in 1990 and lived at Deer Path Animal Haven, a roadside zoo in Illinois. When this closed in 1998, Patrick went to Shambala.

    There is a four-year-old liger on display at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, USA.

    Wild Animal Safari in Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA, have been breeding ligers since 2000. As of October 2005 they had several adult ligers.

    In September 1975, a tigress sharing a cage with a lion at a zoo in Osaka, Japan, gave birth to 3 cubs described as having tiger's heads and lion's bodies. Two died soon after birth and the third soon after the news reported.

    A liger born in 2002 at Fuzhou, Fujian Province, lived for more than 100 days. In July 2004, a liger cub born in a wildlife park in Hainan, China died of respiratory failure 72 hours after birth. It had been born to the tigress "Huanhuan" and a lion called "Xiaoerhei". It was born underweight and its death was attributed to congenital respiratory failure. Huanhuan had rejected the cub and it had been ****led by a domestic dog that had just whelped in the hope of getting colostrum. The zoo plans to breed further ligers. On 6th December 2004, a Bengal tigress produced healthy liger cubs sired by an African lion. The Russian Information Agency Novosti claimed it to be the first liger ever produced from this combination (possibly the first in Russia). The parents lived in neighbouring caves in the Novosibirsk zoo and got used to each other. The female liger cub was named Zita and resembles her tigress mother with clear tiger stripes, but has a lion's background colour and many leonine features. Her brother remains with his parents in another Siberian zoo. In 2005, two tigons and three ligers were bred at the Shenzhen safari park, in southern China (near Hong Kong).

    In April 2005, a liger (erroneously called a tigron) called Samil was born at the Italian Circus in Vigo, northwestern Spain. Samil is a cross between a female tiger and a lion and therefore is a liger.



    Ligers in popular culture
    • The title character of the movie Napoleon Dynamite declares ligers to be "pretty much" his favorite animal, and states that they are "bred for their skills in magic". [1] The liger he draws in the movie does not look like a real liger, rather resembling a manticore. A ramshackle roadside zoo near Preston, Idaho, where the film is set, once housed a menagerie of lion-tiger hybrids as well as lions, tigers and wolves. In 1995, some of the animals escaped, prompting an area-wide search-and-destroy mission for the animals. [2]
    • Multiple mecha from the Zoids franchise (including manga, anime and model kits) are classified as the Liger-type. The most well known examples are the Blade Liger and Liger Zero.
    • In the new Transformers Galaxy Force series, where a figure scans a liger as an alternate mode, and is now known as Liger Jack. He combines with Galaxy Convoy to become Liger Convoy.
    • Jushin Liger (anime) - a popular anime hero created by the legendary Go Nagai.
    • Jushin Liger - a professional wrestler
    • In the anime and manga Duel Masters, there is a card called 'Deathliger, Lion of Chaos'.
    • In the Marvel UK comic book series Warheads, the leader of the mystical mercenaries called the Warheads is named Col. Tigon Liger.
    Lord High Keeper of the Knowledge of Right and Wrong, Counselor in Moments of Temptation, and Guide along the Straight and Narrow Path and Oldest Active DWT/WDW Radio Member

    DL: 1955* (1); WDW: 1977* (2), 1980* (2), 1985* (3), 1989* (3), 1996 (ASMu-3), 1999 (ASMo-3), 2000 (ASMu-2/PO-2), 2001 (ASMu-5), 2002 (ASMu-5), 2003 (ASMo-5), 2004* (8), 2004 (ASMo-8), 2005 (PC-10), 2006* (15), 2007* (20), 2008* (22), 2009* (26), 2010* (27), 2011* (32), 2012* (39), 2013* (36), 2013* (15), 2013* (9), 2013* (13), 2014* (40) Total Trips/Days = 26/353

    *Off Property

  15. #15
    the7thAve's Avatar
    the7thAve is offline Pepper's Ghost
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Gulf Shrimp
    Posts
    2,933
    yeah, I think the mention of the Liger was probly originally meant by GaRain as a Napolean Dynamite reference. but maybe not...

    If we can dream it, we can do it

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •