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WDW Radio # 789 – Top Ten Iconic Sounds in Walt Disney World

We’ll share our Top Ten Iconic Sounds in Walt Disney World this week, from the nostalgic, familiar, and memorable ones, to those that may even elicit an emotional response. And I’m sure that you will find at least one on this list that you know, love, remember, and enjoy… and maybe want to add a few of your own!

 What is your favorite iconic Walt Disney World sound?

Share your thoughts in the WDW Radio Clubhouse at WDWRadio.com/Clubhouse, or call the voicemail at 407-900-9391 (WDW1) and share your story on the show.

Summary

In this episode of WDW Radio, host Lou Mongello is joined by Tim Foster to delve into the enchanting world of Disney parks through the evocative power of sound.

The heart of the episode focuses on the significance of sounds within Walt Disney World. From the iconic TTA sound to the calming clop of horses on Main Street, USA, Lou and Tim share their favorite auditory memories that transport them back to the magic of the parks. They delve into the intricately designed soundscapes of areas like Galaxy’s Edge and Pandora, explaining how years of careful sound design contribute to the authenticity and immersion of these fantastical worlds. The hosts emphasize how these sounds can conjure nostalgia and enhance the overall park experience, illustrating their importance in storytelling and environmentality.

Additionally, Lou and Tim reminisce about other nostalgic Disney sounds, such as the manual closing of monorail doors, the distinctive boat whistles, and the various sounds in beloved attractions like the Haunted Mansion and Pirates of the Caribbean. They reflect on how these auditory details create a complete sensory experience that defines a visit to Walt Disney World. The conversation also touches on the park’s emphasis on natural sound management techniques, highlighting Disney’s commitment to environmentality and conservation.

As the episode concludes, the hosts engage in a light-hearted discussion about phone ringtones and Lou’s preference for joyful sounds, particularly the laughter of children in the parks. Tim jokes about his most feared sound being Lou saying, “wait for me,” adding a humorous endnote. This nostalgic and detailed exploration of Disney sounds not only transports listeners back to their cherished memories in the parks but also underscores the meticulous craftsmanship that makes Disney experiences so uniquely magical.

Thanks to Tim Foster from CelebrationsPress.com for joining me this week!

Subscribe, recommend, share, and leave a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify and join the WDW Radio Nation to help support the show… and help make children’s wishes come true.


  • Lou Mongello and Tim Foster discuss their collection of Disney memorabilia.
  • Lou mentions having a DVD with all three versions of “Journey into Imagination” and a Figment plush for his son.
  • They promote Celebrations Press’ website and solicit ideas for future top ten lists.
  • They discuss their favorite sounds in Walt Disney World, specifically the TTA sound.
  • They talk about ringtones and confusion about phone technology, ending on a playful note.
  • Walt Disney World parks prioritize environmentality and use natural methods to manage wildlife without chemicals.
  • Background sounds, such as bird distress calls, are used to deter unwanted behavior.
  • Sound designers spend years perfecting sounds in Galaxy’s Edge and Pandora, aiming for immersive environments.
  • The sounds in Galaxy’s Edge create excitement, while those in Pandora provide tranquility.
  • Lou and Tim highlight the joy of children’s laughter at Disney World and Lou’s decision to move closer to the parks.
  • Tim recalls specific nostalgic sounds from attractions like Test Track and the monorail.
  • Lou shares memories of the manual door-closing sound on the monorail, asking listeners to confirm their own experiences.
  • They touch on sounds from Pirates of the Caribbean, including cannons and seagulls.
  • Discussion of nostalgic sounds includes Thunder Mountain Railroad and Living with the Land.
  • They mention the Magic Band chime at park entrances and other iconic attraction sounds.
  • The episode explores how sounds create strong emotional and nostalgic responses in visitors.
  • Tim and Lou discuss the changing sounds in Pandora from day to night and hidden audio effects in the park.
  • Lou notes the absence of the background murmur of voices post-Covid and longs for the joy of crowds.
  • They joke about sound-related fears, like Lou’s dislike for crying kids and Tim’s “wait for me” line.
  • Tim connects Journey into Imagination with Figment to a forthcoming book on the attraction.
  • Noteworthy sounds like free throws in basketball and the TTA Peoplemover are recounted.
  • Lou and Tim feel nostalgic over the Frontierland shooting arcade and its closure.
  • They discuss boat whistles at resorts and the calming sound of the Liberty Bell riverboat.
  • Lou struggles to recall iconic sounds at Epcot, mentioning artificially inserted bird sounds.
  • The episode emphasizes how detailed atmospheric sounds enhance the fictional worlds in the parks.
  • Iconic sounds mentioned include the clopping of horses on Main Street, USA, and the Walt Disney World Railroad whistle.
  • They discuss the emotional impact of these sounds and their ability to transport visitors back to the parks.
  • Tim mentions the evocative TTA’s clack-clack sound and similar chimes in Tomorrowland.
  • They touch on iconic sounds of the Haunted Mansion, including the howling dog and rattling doorknockers.
  • The possibility of a top ten list of Haunted Mansion sounds is discussed, ending on a creative note.

Quotes and Quips

1. On Nostalgia and Emotional Connection:
“We all have those sounds we hear when we are in Walt Disney World that are familiar and nostalgic, memorable, and yes, maybe even a little bit comforting.”
— Lou Mongello [00:02:43][00:02:55]

2. On the Magic of Disney Sounds:
“Disney is all about how it makes us feel. And sometimes, as we’ve explained on past shows, it’s not just something that we see or smells, but also what we hear.”
— Lou Mongello [00:03:14][00:03:26]

3. On the Importance of Audio Details:
“We sort of emphasize the importance of appreciating some of the subtle audio details that I think enhance the overall experience.”
— Lou Mongello [00:05:10][00:05:18]

4. On the Power of Memory and Sensory Experience:
“It’s kind of like smells in the sense of, you don’t really think about these things. Top of mind when you think about Walt Disney World, but when you, in this case, hear them, they do take you right there.”
— Tim Foster [00:05:34][00:05:45]

5. On the Emotional Impact of Disney Sounds:
“I think these sounds are often comforting, even ones that don’t have any dialogue or not necessarily a piece of music.”
— Lou Mongello [00:07:26][00:07:34]

6. On the Nostalgia of Disney Attractions:
“The people mover is not just an attraction to get a tour of Tomorrowland, but I think it’s a great place to unwind.”
— Lou Mongello [00:13:23][00:13:30]

7. On the Sounds of Main Street, USA:
“One of my favorite things to do, Tim, is just sit right down the middle of Main Street USA and literally or metaphorically close my eyes and just listen to a lot of the sounds there.”
— Lou Mongello [00:28:05][00:28:15]

8. On the Authenticity of Disney’s Hollywood Studios:
“These are actual acme semaphone traffic lights that produce a very distinctive, like, clunk. And then you hear this whirring sounds as a sign switch between stop and go.”
— Lou Mongello [00:38:39][00:38:52]

9. On the Tranquility of Disney’s Watercraft:
“It’s relaxing, it’s tranquil, but it’s also, I’m here in Walt Disney World. I don’t hear these whistles anywhere else.”
— Tim Foster [00:44:25][00:44:35]

10. On the Immersive Sounds of Pandora:
“The sounds of alien wildlife and the distant and sometimes close call of different creatures… It helps to paint the picture, the visual picture of this lush and vibrant environment that is alive.”
— Lou Mongello [00:57:49][00:58:20]


Timestamped Overview / Chapters

  • [00:00] Familiar sounds at Disney World evoke emotions.
  • [05:48] Enjoy the rhythmic sounds of Space Mountain.
  • [13:52] Nostalgic memories of attraction evoke pleasant emotions.
  • [17:54] The haunted mansion sound is everywhere.
  • [25:08] Immersive Main Street USA sound experience
  • [28:31] Walt Disney train: iconic sounds, nostalgic feelings.
  • [32:51] Restored steam engines and authentic park sounds.
  • [40:13] Tranquil boat rides evoke relaxation at Disney.
  • [46:17] Memorable sounds at the Electric Umbrella.
  • [51:35] Sound designers create authentic, immersive environments.
  • [53:55] Detailed audio picture enriches Pandora’s vibrant environment.
  • [01:00:52] Peaceful spots at Disney Parks away from crowds.
  • [01:04:58] Missing the sound of crowds, emotional realization.
  • [01:14:44] Nostalgic game involving party line and music.
  • [01:17:00] Exciting sounds of yeti and jungle cruise.
  • [01:21:10] Listen for joy, laughter in parks, love.
  • [01:27:46] Find us at celebrationspress.com for more content.

Episode Transcript

Click Here To Read The Full Podcast Episode Transcript

Lou Mongello:
We all have them. I do. You do. You might not even be consciously aware of what they are until you think about them. But we all have those sounds, those sounds we hear when we are in Walt Disney World that are familiar and nostalgic, memorable and yes, maybe even a little bit comforting. And I think they make us smile consciously or inwardly, and hopefully might even elicit a little bit of an emotional response that's not just okay, that's awesome, because Disney is all about how it makes us feel. And sometimes, as we've explained on past shows, it's not just something that we see or smells, which we revisited back on show 675, but also what we heard. I and specifically for this week's show, I'm not talking about the music or the narration or the dialogue or our favorite quotes.

Lou Mongello:
I'm talking about the top ten iconic sounds in Walt Disney World. It could be something we hear in the background, maybe that just sort of exists in our subconscious, but that we love and we know and remember. And I think we long to hear. I when we can't get to the parks as often as we would like. Excuse me. So this week, let's explore some of those familiar and favorite sounds in our top ten ish list with someone who, when you hear the sound of a top ten list, the sound of his dulcet tones and melodic voice just comes to mind. He is, of course, Tim Foster from Celebrations magazine.

Tim Foster:
See, I was gonna say, lou, you sound fantastic, but you beat me to the sound joke.

Lou Mongello:
Now listen, it takes me. It takes me seconds to think of what to say.

Tim Foster:
I love this topic. This is gonna be fun.

Lou Mongello:
And, you know, we've talked, looked, and we've been doing like, I've been podcasting for 20 years. You've been a part of the show my life for most of that time. And we've talked about, like, top ten quotes and top ten pieces of music. But these are just sounds. They can be sound effects or sounds that exist in the background. They could be man made, they could be natural. And I was looking back and I'm like, have we talked about this before? We did, back on show 231, we talked about some of the hidden audio treasures in Walt Disney World, where we sort of emphasize the importance of appreciating some of the subtle audio details that I think enhance the overall experience. But I think, Tim, I think these are more familiar ones that we know and love.

Lou Mongello:
And like I said, it's not about dialogue, it's not about a piece of music, but just these familiar sounds that I think for a lot of the, I'll speak for myself. Like, they have meaning. They have meaning for a variety of reasons.

Tim Foster:
I think when you did this, when I was going through my list, I had a lot of the same thing. It was kind of like smells in the sense of, you don't really think about these things top of mind when you think about Walt Disney World. But when you, in this case, hear them, they do take you right there. It's like a very memory, sensory memory thing. And they're very powerful because I was, as I was listening, listening all these, I'm hearing them in my mind and, man, I'm back. I'm in Walt Disney world. This is great. So, and I'll talk about more as we go through the list, the ones that especially do that.

Tim Foster:
But, yeah, one of those things you don't really think about. But, yeah, it's a pretty, it's a big part of the experience.

Lou Mongello:
And it's why, like, since literally show number one, like, for 20 years, I start the show with the sound of the radio tuning, because I want you to hear something that, like, generates a smile or a memory or makes you wonder, like, oh, where have I heard this one before? So you make it a game. It. Like I said, I think these sounds are often comforting, even ones that don't have any dialogue or not necessarily a piece of music. Like I said, these are familiar ones that we know and love. And speaking of knowing and loving, Tim, I want you to go first, because, again, we never talk about these ahead of time. And I'm always, I also don't give you a lot of direction intentionally, because, no, you don't. I want to see. I want to see where.

Lou Mongello:
Wait, I want to see where it goes. Do you remember? I just thought of this like, this has got to be a decade ago. I said, tim, we're going to do a segment on top ten places to stop and smell the roses, metaphorically speaking. And you're like, well, the first place I go is the rose garden. I'm like, no, no, no. I did not say that. I'm gonna go and find the clip from that show.

Tim Foster:
Come on.

Lou Mongello:
You're like, oh, I thought these were, like, places that there's roses.

Tim Foster:
So I dispute that. But, hey, why not?

Lou Mongello:
But by saying, I don't know how.

Tim Foster:
I can mess this one up, you did. You did lay out all the rules. No music, no dialogue, no safety spiels and all of that. So I'm not sure how I can mess this up, but I'm gonna try with my first one, it's gonna be.

Lou Mongello:
A go with me here, right out of the gate, isn't it?

Tim Foster:
There actually is a little go with me here. No, not really. But so actually, the first. And I've actually thought about this many times over the years, too. So the first thing I thought of when you said this was actually the TTA. And I can see the pain in your face as I'm recording. And I probably still. But it's actually for a couple reasons.

Tim Foster:
One, and I'll start with part b, but I'll come back to part a.

Lou Mongello:
I like how you start with one and then you go to b, which.

Tim Foster:
Is fine, this is the way it works. But because I'm thinking of the clack, clack, clack as you go through that sound of you going along the tracks and going over those linear induction motors and picking up speed as you go into the main thoroughfare and so forth. And there's just something about that sound, especially when you're going through Space Mountain and it's echoing and it's all around you. But that's the second sound that came to mind. The first sound that came to mind was the chimes that you hear as you approach the fictional stations or tomorrowland stops, depending on the narration you're listening to. And I actually, to reassure myself they were still there. I believe they're still there, but I always worry. But it's one of those things.

Tim Foster:
I never really think about it until I'm there. As I'm walking down into tomorrowland and I'll hear those chimes, or riding tomorrowland and hear them even when I'm listening on my phone to the recording and I hear it, I am there. I am in tomorrowland. I'm in a totally different place. I am in this world where aliens and robots and humans can come play and work and all of that, I'm there. And the funny thing, this is the go with me here part. And this is just kind of reinforcing my story that this is such a memory, sensory, powerful thing. Because I.

Tim Foster:
Not a big basketball person. Now you're going, tim, what are you talking about? So not a big basketball person. But I started watching my Philadelphia 76 ers because that's where I live. And the reason I bring this up, though, they have a thing. And I don't know if all teams do this, because I don't really know basketball, but when we make free throws in the stadium, they play a chime that sounds very similar to the Tomorrowland chime. When they make their free throws. And when they did that, I. Oddly enough, I'm in.

Tim Foster:
I'm watching basketball, but I'm in tomorrowland. I'm on the TTA riding this. And I got a warm, magical feeling. And I kept watching the Sixers just to watch him make free throws. So I could hear that chime again, even though it's not the same thing. But just my point, that it's such a random. It was such a random thing. It's not even identical.

Tim Foster:
It's close, but it was close enough to trigger that memory of that sound that takes me back to Tomorrowland, the magic kingdom. And all those memories come flooding back so well.

Lou Mongello:
I'm just qualifying this for two reasons. One, you stole the thump thumb sound. And two, you know, it's funny because I thought about the chimes, and I'm like, am I going to disqualify this? Because technically, it's music. I know it's not. It's not. I'm with you because they are. There's sort of these. These melodic tones that without even sort of me playing them for reference, chances are, you who's listening in your car at home, you hear it.

Lou Mongello:
You hear it in your mind, right, with these wonderful sort of xylophone like musical signals that, in a sense, it sort of encapsulates and almost represents this futuristic theme of tomorrowland. That being said, I did have. I just. The thump thump, right? That thumping over the maglev pucks, the magnetic levitation pucks. There's this repeated, rhythmic, like, thumping sound as it transitions from one to the other. And I started to think about, like, why? Like, what is it about this? And I think there's a lot of. I really tried to sort of analyze what it is about these sounds. It's not just because we love the attraction, right? I think there's this sense of movement.

Lou Mongello:
There's a sense of progress. There's a sense of being on a future transportation system. I also think that there's something soothing about this, and I don't know how to describe it. Like, I was just to say, you know, if you want to let your kids fall asleep, take them on the people mover. Because I think there's that thump thumb, dum, dum, dum, dum. It's almost like this constant rhythmic heartbeat that is immediately recognizable. Like. And there's.

Lou Mongello:
There's almost, you know, like a hypnotic. I don't know how else to describe it. Like, it's relaxed and almost hypnotic. And, I think, deeply nostalgic for a lot of Disney fans. So the people mover is not just an attraction to get a tour of Tomorrowland, but I think it's. I think it's a great place to unwind. And I think the sounds of this, coupled with the background audio and the music, et cetera, really is one of the things that makes what you hear on the TT peoplemover. Sorry.

Lou Mongello:
Is as important of an element as what you see.

Tim Foster:
It's funny, I call it TTA. You call it people mover.

Lou Mongello:
I'm trying to sort of use the proper. It's the TTA in my heart, but it's the people mover on the maps, isn't it?

Tim Foster:
Tomorrowland Transit Authority. People who are the most difficult attraction name to pronounce in the entire Walt Disney world.

Lou Mongello:
The highway, your highway in the sky, whatever. But, yeah, so I'm with you, man, very much, very much on my list. I want to preface my first one and give you a peek, God help you, into my mind and how I sort of came up with my list. And for me, and this is like the truth, I just sat down and I closed my eyes and I let the first sounds that came into my mind hit my list. I let myself be seven years old again. I thought about where this sort of internal prompt took me. Spoiler alert. Right? To magic kingdom.

Lou Mongello:
And the things that I would hear that would make me smile or make me think about my parents. And no, spoiler number two, none of these are food related, I don't think.

Tim Foster:
Whoa.

Lou Mongello:
Hey, wait.

Tim Foster:
Really?

Lou Mongello:
There's no, like, sound of the. Of oysters getting shucked at the boathouse. Although now I mentioned it.

Tim Foster:
You were saying it without saying it.

Lou Mongello:
But these are also not about what attractions are my favorites or where I go first. But really, as I walk through the parks, these are the sounds I listen for, or sometimes even make it a point to stop and listen, or even if it's not my destination, I can sort of hear in the periphery and may or may not make me internally and externally smile. So the first one on my list, I want to take you back in time. That's going back in time sound. I want to take you back in time to Boot Hill in the year 1850, or in reality, last week. I'm going to take you back to Saturday, June 22, 2024, because this is the last time, as I wipe away a silent tear, that we heard the sound of the frontierland shooting arcade. So I know technically, it is now an extinct attraction. However, this is.

Lou Mongello:
And, Tim, I don't know why. I don't know. I don't know when the last time is that it actually put quarters or dollars or whatever in the slots. It shows you how long it's been. But the sound of the rifle, that's what I mean. Like, as I'm walking through frontierland, I consciously listen for it. And there's something about that that helps to set this sort of immersive stage for frontierland as a whole and transports us back into the wild west. I think about, you know, playful competitions with my dad or brother and the fact that I had a really tough time hitting the target.

Lou Mongello:
But when I did, you had all these other sounds, right? That clicked in the clinks and the dings and all sorts of the animated reactions of a tin can or a bell or whatever it might be. And I think that right there's that instant feedback, there's that sort of instant reward system and that you have this sort of sense of accomplishment. But I think for me, a lot of this is very much attached to nostalgia. Not just like, not nostalgia for the west or western films, but using this attraction, playing this attraction a lot. As a kid, I associate it with laughter and talking with people as you're doing it, and some of the different sounds and the ambient music that came from it. I wish I could go back in time to when this attraction first opened. And I know I was there in November of 1971, back when they used to use. So these are actually refitted 54 caliber Hawkins rifles.

Lou Mongello:
But at the beginning, they actually shot real lead pellets from the rifles. Hello, lawyers at the target way. So forget about the safety concerns. But the problem, the reason why they modified them was because they had to keep repainting the targets every night because they were the paint getting kept on, getting chipped off by the pellets, how anybody allowed them to, you know, shoot real pellets. But I wonder what that sound was like as opposed to sort of the manufactured sound when. When the, um, into the. The led hits the hits the target. So, um, for whatever reason, Tim, the, uh, the rest in peace, the now extinct frontierland shooting arcade was the first thing that came to my mind.

Tim Foster:
Well, see, now this is sad. I've been off the Internet, I guess. Lou, you're. You're breaking this news to me. I didn't know this. Oh, boy. Not that I play. I think we played.

Tim Foster:
My daughter did it one time, but, yeah, it was fun. But it was definitely part of the. Just walking down frontierland, just hearing that in the background. Yeah.

Lou Mongello:
And you know, it exists in other Disney primer. I just came from Disneyland Paris and remember stopping and seeing and wanting to play it there again. I didn't have any coins, but I didn't. I stopped and watched. And I wonder, you know, this is going to be a Disney vacation club sort of rest area in frontierland. You wonder if this sound is sounding the death knell for Disneyland and Disneyland Paris and some of the other arcades that exist around the world.

Tim Foster:
Well, the way to start the show on an optimistic note there. Back to you now. I'll do this. I'm actually very surprised you didn't take this off the list on the very first item. So I could easily do a two for one here, but I'm only going to do one. I know, even though I did that.

Lou Mongello:
In the first, I'm going to write down on my little sticky note where I think that you're going to see. Okay, which one you take next. Go ahead.

Tim Foster:
So, in terms of sounds, and this actually is a sound that also falls into the category, I know I am in Walt Disney world when I. And it is when I hear the howling coming from the haunted.

Lou Mongello:
There you go. And I'm a haunted.

Tim Foster:
There it is. There it is. And as you know, there's a number two second one that goes right along with this. But I'll leave that for you to maybe fall on the back. But that how. And actually clear it up for me. Lou, is it a wolf or is it a dog? What is it?

Lou Mongello:
It's a. My understanding is that it is a dog.

Tim Foster:
It is a dog. Okay. The howling dog.

Lou Mongello:
Why would there be a wolfenk in.

Tim Foster:
The howling at the moon wolf?

Lou Mongello:
Madeleine, there's a big, huge wolf population in the Hudson river valley. But yeah, we might be. We might be wrong. Anyway, it wouldn't be the first time, but it's.

Tim Foster:
It's one of those things. And it's not. Certainly, it's about the haunted mansion and being, when you're at the haunted mansion in the queue, hearing that is obviously a big part of the, the allure of the attraction itself. But I'm talking when you're. You're not even there. Like, you can hear it from on a, on a windless day, you could hear it from the contemporary or even the wilderness lodge, if the wind is right, certainly on the way over or walking over or when you go in. And it's just one of those sounds you can hear from everywhere. And it's like I said to me, it's not just about the haunted mansion.

Tim Foster:
It's usually the first thing we hear that tells us. You're in Walt Disney world now, and that whole world is left behind. So that's my first one. And like I said, there's a second part to this, so I'll let you mention that if you want to.

Lou Mongello:
So, look, we could do top ten sounds of the haunted mansion.

Tim Foster:
We could. And I actually have another one on the list, which is inside, but that's another.

Lou Mongello:
I do, too. I have multiple. I was. This is where I was actually gonna go next, because I wanted to steal it from you before you got into it. So let's just. Let's just have a conversation about haunted mansion, because I, too, after all these years, Tim, we're actually. We're really coming together, and our lists are starting to align.

Tim Foster:
It only took 20 years.

Lou Mongello:
The first sound that I thought of was the sound of the howling dog. And it's funny because it's not such a super prominent sound. You don't hear it often. You don't hear it through the attraction, but that sort of mournful howl that you can hear outside. And, you know, sometimes you don't even be, like, near the haunted mansion. Like, you can hear it farther away. It's eerie and it's haunting, and it. It gives you this sort of sense of unease, and it's sort of a reminder and sort of a hint of what is to come, right.

Lou Mongello:
It's this quintessentially spooky sound, right. And sort of makes you wonder, like, where is the dog? What is the dog doing? Is this the dog that we see? But then I'm like, well, wait a minute. There's other sounds in the haunted mansion that instantly come to mind when I close my eyes. Like, I think about the sound of rolling thunder that you hear inside and outside, particularly, like, inside the mansion, and that deep rumblings. And I love the sound of. I love lightning and thunder. I know I'm weird. Like, I love sitting outside undercover and hearing the sound.

Lou Mongello:
I do. There is something, like, wonderfully comforting. I don't know. And I know it's also the thunder supposed to sort of be the sound of impending doom and lots of tension.

Tim Foster:
It is dangerous.

Lou Mongello:
It's very dangerous. But there is a. I think there's an emotional element to it, too. And I'm like, well, wait a minute. Now I'm thinking inside the attraction, and we talked about the thump, thump, thump, thump of the. Of the maglev pucks. There's also that similar slow, rhythmic thumping in the attic scene where we hear the heartbeat of one Constance Hatchaway, the ghostly bride. This one, it's more haunting, it's more intimate.

Lou Mongello:
It gives you this sense of dread. It sort of symbolizes this lingering presence of the bride and the history that is associated with her. Like, there's something very ominous about this heartbeat as well as, you know, maybe a little tragic and mysterious. And, I mean, these are. These are three, Tim. But I think that the sounds of the dog and the thunder and the heartbeat are one not just prime examples of attention to detail, but how these auditory elements work in such harmony with the visual effects and the storytelling to create this remarkably immersive experience that has not changed, nor should it change, in the past 50 plus years.

Tim Foster:
Oh, man. And I actually had a couple more on mine. I'll throw them in here since Layman.

Lou Mongello:
Lay them on me, brother.

Tim Foster:
I had a couple. I had the heartbeat, of course, and it's just so eerie how they're not like it's a light hearted romp through Candyland before that by any stretch, but definitely attic things. So take an ominous turn when you're in there with that heartbeat. And even with the current constance hatchway figure, it's one thing, but I even go back to the prior version of the bride when she was just the bride, and it was just this. I'm doing the motions like you can see me, but just standing there with this red heart with no story, no explanation, no name, no anything. But I also think of when you're going down the corridor of the doors and hear the rattling of the door knockers and the handles and. And then you come to the clock with the ominous.

Lou Mongello:
That clock was the other one.

Tim Foster:
Talk. And then, I don't know if you count this as safety spiel narration or something, but the one thing we're fond of doing when you're in the. And you actually think, Lou, you told me to do this, was in the stretching room to hang around a little bit, let everybody leave and listen for the. And the get out. And that is always fun. Every time, if I ever bring anybody new, I have them hang back and they listen to it. And it's. I want to say they're happy.

Tim Foster:
I think they're more scared, but serves them right for listening to me. But. But, yeah, then that's. We rattled off six there. We could probably come up with 1020 more if we wanted to, but yeah. So the haunted mansion.

Lou Mongello:
Yeah. You could also like, you know, the guy who's trying to get out of the.

Tim Foster:
Yes.

Lou Mongello:
You know, the coffin that's nailed shut.

Tim Foster:
Piano. Well, that's music. So, you know, right.

Lou Mongello:
I'm trying to stay away from the music. Yeah. But even just the sound of the ride mechanism itself as you go through. So. All right, assuming that it's my turn, I'm really. This is like a fantasy draft. I'm trying to be strategic in my list. Like, do I take one that was super high on my list or do I take one that I think Tim is going to see?

Tim Foster:
That's the thing. Are you going for genuine goodness or are you just trying to be mean to me?

Lou Mongello:
These are all genuinely good. It's just the order that I want to do it. There's a bonus of, look, we're going to have, obviously, multiple.

Tim Foster:
I have 20 on my list, by the way.

Lou Mongello:
There was one that I sort of. Again, I really did what I said. I closed my eyes and just started jotting down the first ones that came to mind, and that dictated the order of my list, at least in terms of notes. But I'm going to go out of order. I'm out of order? You're out of order. This entire top ten is out of order. But I am going to stay in the same general area that I find that a number of clips that are. Because your clips are on my list.

Lou Mongello:
Because this clip was on my list. I'm going to go to Main street, USA. And I don't know if there's a particular name for this sound, but one of my favorite things to do, Tim, is just sit right down the middle of Main Street, USA and literally or metaphorically close my eyes and just listen to a lot of the sounds there. And I find as I'm closing my eyes right now, we can sort of tune in what we want to listen to. Right. Are we listening to one of the sounds that will be on my list? Are we listening to the music in the background? Are we listening to, you know, parents yelling at their kids, whatever it might be, but the sound that. That I thought of and you don't hear all the time, but it that same thing. It's this calm, nostalgic and immersive sound that puts me into this early 20th century setting of small town Main street, USA is the clopping of the horses as they.

Lou Mongello:
As they pull the main street trolley. Again, it's that same thing, right? It's. It's that rhythmic clopping that is very distinctive, that I think it's a nostalgic sound of a simpler time. And this, like, it's this. It's the same thing, Tim. It's like. It's like the last two things we talked about. It's a sort of steady, kind of measured beat is like a hallmark of, I think, back to when early on, especially, things have changed a little bit.

Lou Mongello:
They used to do sort of the welcome show on the other side of the train, and then you walked into Main street, and sort of main street came to life. And the sound of the early morning of the trolley cars making their way up and down Main street is. Is, for me, like a hallmark of main street. Right? So it transports me to times being there with my family, and I think it transports us to what I know, me personally, which could be a simpler time and a simpler sort of bygone era in small town America. And then you have these clopping hooves. You. You have, like, the little jingle of the harnesses and the reins. It just sort of continues to sort of paint this auditory picture of the authenticity and the charm of this very immersive and environment of Main Street USA that makes us feel like we've stepped into this to what Walt wanted, this idyllic, turn of the century town.

Tim Foster:
I love that. I'm just picturing you sitting cross legged in the middle of Main street with your eyes closed.

Lou Mongello:
Can somebody help this guy rocking that crisscross applesauce on Main Street?

Tim Foster:
I love that. And actually, my next one, I'm gonna stay on Main street, and it's actually gonna be kind of part two of my other answer, but so sort of on Main street. And it kind of has a. I think a lot of these towns are gonna have multiple reasons why we like them, but this is the. The obvious one. I feel like that everybody's probably screaming out there, but is the train whistle of the waltz.

Lou Mongello:
Yeah.

Tim Foster:
Walt Disney World railroad. And for two reasons. One, the attraction itself, when you're on it and you're riding around just the sounds of the train, the real train, and you hear all of it. You hear the engines and the chug chug and all of that, which we hadn't actually ridden it for quite a while, it having been down, and, like, I haven't been there when it was open. So I know the first time when we wrote it again, that was a big part of just hearing the sounds and the sensations of actually riding a train. But even more so good to go along with the howling at the haunted mansion, hearing that train whistle, that's like part two of I know I'm in Walt Disney World when I'm. We just arrived, I'm walking out of the contemporary or getting on the boat to go from the Wilderness lodge. And you hear that train whistle just coming across the water and the trees, and you can hear it from everywhere.

Tim Foster:
And we, having heard it again recently, because once the railroad came back, realized how much we missed it when the railroad was not there, and times we weren't there when it was down with all the construction things that were going on. And hearing it once again, that one, it's, hey, I'm in Walt Disney World. It was kind of a reassuring, like, hey, we're back in Walt Disney World, and everything's back to normal, even though it's all new. But. But it's. It's. It's great. It's the wolf.

Tim Foster:
I think you can. The wolf. The dog is harder to explain, but the whistle is just that nostalgic. Main street anywhere or anytown, USA, feel that it's Walt Disney back in his day, you know, Walt Disney's love for trains, and we can connect the dots that way. That's such a more direct connection to Walt Disney and Walt Disney World and Disneyland and everything. So hard to explain, though. Howling why it appeals to us. But the train whistle, definitely so.

Tim Foster:
But again, instant we hear that, we know we're home.

Lou Mongello:
So I'm with you, but I'm not with you because I had the Walters World railroad on my list, but not for the whistle. Oh, I have it for the bella. I have it for the train. I thought of, the first thing I thought of was the bell. And I think I have a whistle on my list elsewhere. But the train bell is so sharp and so clear that you talked about the ambient noise of the park and the crowds. It wonderfully sort of cuts through that. Right.

Lou Mongello:
It cuts through that ambient noise, and it gives you that instant sort of sense of nostalgia and the charm and the atmosphere of Main Street, I think you're right. It's the fact that it's directly connected to Walt and his love of trains. But I think, too, where it is in the park is important because, especially if it's. I talked about sort of the welcome show that used to be. But as you're walking in the park and, you know, really sort of the first attraction you see, and one of the first sounds that you probably hear is the whistle and the bell. And I think that it symbolizes a lot of different things, at the very least, and on its most basic level, the beginning of your adventure in the magic kingdom. It also could symbolize the first ride of the day. It might symbolize this, you know, a break from the hustle and bustle.

Lou Mongello:
So while it might be something that is exciting. At the same time, I think it's also very relaxing. So it helps, again, to sort of paint the picture of Main street, but I think also has, like, feelings that. That hit us differently again. And I'm a very nostalgic, sentimental person, so that's a lot of what I think about when I hear that again, that sort of rhythmic sound of the train.

Tim Foster:
Bella, it's funny you said that, though, because the first thing I thought of train was the whistle. I didn't even think of the bell. But when you said that we've been talking about this, I instantly heard it. My mind, as you said it, and I instantly went back there. Yes, of course I can hear it. I can hear it now. Bing. I can.

Tim Foster:
Yes.

Lou Mongello:
And the fact that they're authentic, like the fact that these.

Tim Foster:
Yes.

Lou Mongello:
Were from authentic, you know, restored steam engines built in the early 20th century, and the story of how they got here from the Yucatan peninsula, all those things are sort of wrapped up in that. For a nerd like me, that thinks about those details and the fact that that bell, you know, if that bell could talk and the stories that it could tell from all those years, not just of Walt disorld guests, I think adds to some of the touch for me. All right, well, now, I don't want to do the next one because it's too close to this one. All right, so I'm going to jump a little bit. And we've obviously, if you notice all of the ones we've talked about, and I'm not sure if this is by design or just because it's been around longest have been in Magic Kingdom. And I'll admit to you, Tim, as I started to, in my mind's eye, the way I do this, because I'm a crazy person, I literally imagine myself sort of flying through the park, right, and stopping at all these different places and listening for sounds as I enter future world or as I go through world showcase, or as I sit in my favorite pavilion, as I go through Disney's animal kingdom, I tried to pull out other sounds that, for me, qualified to hop onto the list. And when I got to one of the other parks, it was instantly a single sound that came to mind. And I had a tough time identifying another sound in this park because I was so fixated on this sound that, once again, is authentic.

Lou Mongello:
It helps with the storytelling and the theming, and I'm gonna use the nostalgia and sentiment word and the immersion into the golden age of Hollywood and the. You have any idea where I'm going, I can't see your face. Do you have any idea where I'm going?

Tim Foster:
I'm curious, because you did go around.

Lou Mongello:
It is a mechanical sound that you could only hear not in one spot, but when they work in five different locations in Disney's Hollywood studios. The only way I can describe it so that you hopefully instantly recognize it and hear it is the bell and the sort of the mechanical sounds of the clunk and the whir of the stop and go signs on Sunset Boulevard and Hollywood Boulevard. In Disney's Hollywood studios.

Tim Foster:
Yeah.

Lou Mongello:
They are located on five different locations throughout the park. Down Hollywood, down sunset. So I think there's one on Hollywood, and there's one on Hollywood and prospect, sunset and Highland, obviously. Hollywood and Vine, Echo park by Keystone, and then all the way down sunset by gowder, which goes down to rock and roller coaster and look. Disney is a storytelling company first, and Disney imagineers are known for the meticulous attention to details. And these lights are no exception. These are actual. I did my research.

Lou Mongello:
These are actual acme semaphone traffic lights that produce a very distinctive, like, clunk. And then you hear this whirring sounds as a sign switch between stop and go, which mimics, like, these are sort of the way traffic signals used to be, like, in the early 19 hundreds. Again, we're talking about this. I don't know why I'm sort of stuck in the sense of nostalgia. And when they work, and the last time I was there, I noticed, like, they, you know, they would work, but they didn't always. They all have, like, this dinge, and they have this, like, bell sound. And if you look very closely at them, you'll see the bell in the back, which would allow pedestrians to sort of get these audio cues if this was a real Hollywood and sunset boulevard, of when to stop and go. And I think I haven't been able to sort of tell, like, there's no sort of rhyme or reason when they go or every x amount of seconds.

Lou Mongello:
But I think that it adds a sense of sort of whimsy almost to the atmosphere because it catches you by surprise and it will stop in your tracks and have to sort of look up and get this fun little attention to details that enhances the experience. Nobody, Tim, would know or care if it wasn't there. But the fact that it is there is the thing that helps to complete this painting of Hollywood during its golden age. So you feel like you're either walking through this historical scene in real Hollywood or on a real movie set where all of the details need to be there in order to complete the scene and the show.

Tim Foster:
Do you know how long I stood waiting at Hollywood and Sunset to go wait for that thing to turn? Are you telling me I didn't have to wait?

Lou Mongello:
Do you know how many times I've stood there with my handy little recorder waiting for it to turn? And then eventually, eventually it does, and then sometimes the bell doesn't ring and I'm like, come on, man. It's one of things that I hope, you know, hopefully I caught it at a time. And the detail. Look, details matter. Everything speaks, right? Michelangelo said, everything speaks when it doesn't work. Right? It speaks. Right? So I'm. Hopefully.

Lou Mongello:
Hopefully they have been fixed. Like, I literally, today, almost went to Hollywood studios just to stand by these signs to see if they were working and to capture that sound.

Tim Foster:
I love that. And actually, that's. That's. I didn't have that on my list. That's one thing I never really paid attention to. I mean, I've seen them, but I didn't stop to watch them. But, yeah, if they weren't there and they weren't working, I would notice probably.

Lou Mongello:
Next time you go, like something. That's the goal, right? We want you. I mean, I wanted listeners now I want you to actually go and stop and look and listen for these on. And again, they're all.

Tim Foster:
But you're telling me I can proceed. I don't have to wait for the green light. You did.

Lou Mongello:
You. I mean, I would love it if you did because it would be hysterical. Like, look at this guy who's not going to scientist stop, but eventually come.

Tim Foster:
Back five minutes later, he's still there because the light. That's funny. Oh, goodness me. So I'm going to go. And actually, to your point, I did what you did. I started in the magic kingdom, but I thought, let me go around to all the other parks. And I did do that. And I actually ended up with a lot of epcot on my list.

Tim Foster:
But my next one, I'm going to go out of the parks entirely. And it's. There's lots of bells and whistles on this list. As we're. As we're doing this, I'm going to go to the boat whistles, and these are for all the boats, not just the ferry boats. And I even thought of, well, no, I won't go there in cases on your list, but these are the launch boats I'm thinking of and the. And the whistles. And to me, that's another I feel like I spent a lot of time standing, reflecting of, I'm here in Walt Disney World instead of actually going in.

Tim Foster:
But that's another case where we hear it. Probably one of the first things you hear, especially if you're at, you know, one of the boat resorts, like wilderness Lodge or the Epcot resorts, but. But there's even nothing quite, like being, like, out on the docks at the wilderness lodge or where it's quiet and you can really hear that boat whistle. And again, it's just one thing that brings me back to Disney, that this is a relaxing one, because it usually reminds me of tranquil journeys across the waters of Bay Lake and seven Seas Lagoon, or Crescent Lake, if you will, aboard these boats, which I think is one of my favorite attractions in all of Walt Disney World. It's not in the parks, but it's. It's a combination of. It's relaxing, it's tranquil, but it's also. I'm here in Walt Disney World.

Tim Foster:
I don't hear these whistles anywhere else. I don't have ferry boats running around my house. And the fun part is, like I said, you can hear them in a lot of places because there are a lot of boats and. Yeah. So that's. That's one of my favorite sounds, is those boat whistles. And especially when I've been waiting 15 minutes from our boat, and there it is.

Lou Mongello:
So, so I had this, and I'm going to sort of piggyback with you because I had this on my list two times, but. But separately. Right. So I had the. I had the sound of the. The watercraft. Right. The watercraft boats and the horns and the whistles, thinking specifically of the seven seas lagoon.

Lou Mongello:
Right. How they sort of connect us and. And how all of them have distinctive sounds. Right. You know, that you might not be able to hear it necessarily in. In your mind, but the horn of the ferry boats on seven seas lagoon. Right. That, again, there's that sense of anticipation as you go is different than the sounds of the friendship boats by Epcot and Hollywood studios or the Sassagoula river boats in some of the resorts and that go to Disney Springs.

Lou Mongello:
There's different sort of qualities of each of those. But the one that really. I had a sort of a separate one. And if I'm jumping on one that you had separately, then that. I won't talk about it. No, but there was a specific other whistle that I had, and it was a liberty bell.

Tim Foster:
That's the one I didn't mention because I thought maybe you will. So I actually left that off my list, thinking you were talking.

Lou Mongello:
Yeah, this is, you know, this is the one. And please understand. So I live. I'm blessed. It is a gift to live as close to the parks as I do. And I've talked about this before, but sometimes, and I have friends who live even closer and they hear it all the time. But when the wind is right and the sound is right, and I can hear the sound of the Liberty bell riverboat whistle from my house, I have heard, on occasion, the howl of the dog. It's more rare.

Lou Mongello:
But there's something about that deep resonance, melodic toot of the horn that literally echoes through Liberty Square and frontierland and out, like, clearly out of the park. Right. Again, when the wind and the weather is right, there's meaning behind the whistles. Right. That multi note toot is not just musical, but there's something commanding about it as well. It captures your attention. It represents certain things, departure and arrival. And now I'm thinking about it with sort of the narration behind it.

Lou Mongello:
There's almost a musical quality to this, and there's a dichotomy to the sound for me, because on one hand, it gives a sense of adventure and excitement. And what are we going to see next as we go just around the riverbend? But there's also something gentle and melodic that is very calming and relaxing and almost reassuring. And when you get on the riverboat and you're there and you hear it, and I think the riverboat is a vastly overlooked attraction. It provides this, like, serene contrast to the other bustling areas of the park. When you're on the riverboat and you're looking at frontierland, which might just be packed with people, you almost don't hear it right because you hear the sound of the water from the paddle wheel. And then when you hear that, that horn that's, like, so commanding just over your head, there's something wonderfully, like, comforting and authentic and historical and immersive about it, which is why it was on my list. And again, we talked about Walt with the trains. I think, you know, I think this sort of ties in with Walt's love of America and commitment that he and all those who have followed in his footsteps.

Lou Mongello:
Commitment to creative, creating it, and not just a. An immersive environment, but one that has to be historically rich and historically accurate.

Tim Foster:
Yeah, I love that. Like I said, almost had it on my list, but figured you would take it. But the lip, the riverboat has this with the train. It's not just the whistle, too. It's. Especially when you're riding. It's the sound. All the sounds.

Tim Foster:
The paddle wheel and the. And the water and all of that. It's. Yes. With you on that one. So, actually, this one, I'm gonna go. I'm gonna hop in your trademark patented wayback machine for this one. And I'm going to epcot, because I did want to get around to the other parks and think about some of the sounds and one of the sounds that we always loved in Epcot, and it's not something we can experience anymore.

Tim Foster:
But this was at. And it took us a while to figure this one out, by the way, this was at the electric umbrella. And we remember sitting outside many, many times wondering, where are all these birds I'm hearing coming from? And then taking us a while to realize, oh, that sounds pumped into, I presume, keep the real birds from eating my hot dog and my chicken sandwich and my french fries and all this other stuff. So it's kind of a one two. So it's not just sitting at the electric umbrella outside, enjoying a snack and relaxing, listening to the birds, but also with the fountain going in the background and hearing just the sounds of the fountain, the watered jets shooting up, and there's a show going on, or even just the. I don't know how you describe the gentle gurgling of water when the fountain is just doing its thing, but the whole sound of that future world plaza right there at the electric umbrella in particular, is one we always loved, and now we're going to miss it because it's not there anymore. I do look forward to coming up with a whole new set of sounds in world celebration and that whole area that we will take forward. But that's one sound I'll never forget, and I wish I could have one day, but that was always our.

Tim Foster:
We're in epcot moment for us.

Lou Mongello:
So. So this is great. I will tell you, I had a very tough time, a very tough time finding an iconic epcot sound. I know that they're there.

Tim Foster:
Oh, I got a bunch of them on my list.

Lou Mongello:
Right? And, you know, like, I think of it now, and I'm like, all certain sounds, and I won't mention because I don't want to take anything, but I think this is. Is great. So you're talking about. You talk about the natural sounds of the birds in Epcot, or you're talking about the artificially inserted sounds, the second.

Tim Foster:
The second part. So, if I'm even. That was my assumption. And maybe you'll correct me on this.

Lou Mongello:
No, you are correct. But there's another. There's sort of a secondary or tertiary sound that when you said it, I forgot about. Do you also know that there's another sound of birds that is artificially inserted? And I think it's not just epcot, I think it's a number of other places. And forgive me, I don't have it in front of me because I just remember this. But there's also the sounds of birds in distress that are pumped in. Don't get nervous. There are sounds of birds in distress that are meant to sort of.

Lou Mongello:
Because, look, Walt Disney World. The Disney parks around environmentality, conservation, if you notice, like, birds are not a problem. Right. Birds swooping down to steal your fries are not a problem. Bugs are not a problem. And the way that they handle a lot of these is not by using chemicals and pesticides and things like that, but by using sort of things in nature, whether they are ladybugs for bugs or sounds to keep birds away. So the sounds of birds in distress are played in the background to signal to other birds that there might be danger around and helps to keep them away. We.

Lou Mongello:
They are invisible to us, but they are often, like, species specific. Using recordings of local bird species that will be present in the area, that increases the effectiveness of deterring unwanted bird behavior.

Tim Foster:
Wow. See, I didn't know that. Now I learned something.

Lou Mongello:
There you go.

Tim Foster:
It's entertaining and educated. That's cool.

Lou Mongello:
Okay. I will, as tempted as I am to go back to Magic kingdom, we will. As long as I'm outside the park, I am going to, if you don't mind, and if you do, that's fine. We'll just talk about it. I'm going to do a little bit of a twofer that exists in two different parks. And if this overlaps with you, then I apologize or whatever, because I think, like the birds, there are so many sounds, Tim, that are invisible to us. These background environmental sounds that, again, help to sort of paint the auditory canvas that we consciously or subconsciously may or may not be paying attention to. And I think there are two places where this is done exceptionally well.

Lou Mongello:
And sometimes we're aware of it, especially as we walk into these lands, but then it sort of becomes invisible, but just helps to complete the detailed storytelling. And I'm talking about the background environmental sounds of Galaxy's edge and Pandora.

Tim Foster:
I'll tell you why I'm laughing when you're done.

Lou Mongello:
Tell me why you're laughing now. Because I'll stop if it's really stupid.

Tim Foster:
No, no. I had this on my list kind of as a one catch all. And the funny thing is, I have question marks behind every one of these. And I'll tell you why after, but I would love because I'm doubting you.

Lou Mongello:
But because this is something that, again, it's almost like a throwaway to the average guest. Like, you're not sitting there thinking about it, but sound designers literally spend years perfecting these sounds to create a believable environment. Not that we know what a believable environment in the black spire outpost or an alien planet sounds like, but these sounds have to sort of feel authentic to the locations, enhance the thematic experience, and also maybe even give subtle or not so subtle nods to each of the respective ips and franchises. So when you're in black spire outpost, you have the sound of this bustling spaceport and ships and roar of spacecraft engines that are instantly familiar. Right? As the kid in 1977, I've heard him said a million times, like watching Star wars, we know what the sound of these engines sound like. Fans who are greater fans than I can, I say they can hear the sound and know probably what or whose ship that might be, right? It helps to create this bustling atmosphere of a real working outpost, right? It creates immersion, it creates excitement. But there's also, and I'll tell you how I really came to be aware of this. There's also the sounds of alien wildlife and creatures and natural elements like the wind and rustling leaves.

Lou Mongello:
And I think that helps to create this sense of wonder and curiosity and realism and immersion and emotional impact and a little bit of mystery and the reason why. And I really sort of became hyper aware of this. I had an amazing opportunity back in early 2021 to go to Galaxy's edge. Before the park opened, I had an opportunity. I was invited to go and photograph the park before park opened. I shared it on Instagram. I'll try and find it and link to it in my show notes. And as much as I was there to capture the environment on, quote unquote, on film, audio, and, I'm sorry, on photos and videos, I was hyper, hyper aware of the sounds.

Lou Mongello:
I was listening almost more than I was what I was seeing, because I had the chance to listen to it without the cacophonous sound of the hum of guests going through. And you really sort of get a sense of just how detailed the audio picture is. We can look at a painting and see how detailed it is. Sometimes with audio, we don't realize it. And the same holds true with Pandora the world of Alphatar again, the sounds of alien wildlife and the distant and sometimes close call of different creatures, like you hear. And I'm thinking, as you sort of cross over the bridge from, like, by no man lounge in Tiffins, where if you sit outside at no man lounge, you can hear a lot of these as they really sort of blend into the environment that you're in and the environment that is across the bridge, the bioluminescent plants and the flowing of water, it helps to paint the picture, the visual picture of this lush and vibrant environment that is alive. So you've got this sense of this tranquil space and place, but this sense of curiosity and wonder. And there's almost a musical quality which is different, I think, than galaxy's edge.

Lou Mongello:
There's a musical quality to the natural, quote unquote natural, artificially made sounds of Pandora that I think adds to this sense of mystery. Look, the idea is that we cross this bridge, we're spanning the 4 million light years, whatever it is, and going to someplace that is literally off world. So there's this sense of awe and mystery, but I think it's also meant to give you this feeling, which is the word I used earlier, this feeling of exploring a living, breathing world. And so when you have these soothing sounds of nature, I think the feeling that it's meant to and it does evoke is this very tranquil and peaceful atmosphere. It's not like this alien planet that, you know, there's a lot of, like, stuff going on. Very different. Right. It's the opposite side of the coin of black spire outpost, where there's some shady creatures going on.

Lou Mongello:
There's all kinds of, like, stuff happening there. This is much more about the flora and the fauna and the. The exotic wildlife that contributes to the believability of, you know, the fact that you've been transported off planet to another world. And, you know, they worked very closely, like with James Cameron and the team, to make sure it was a collaborative effort to make sure that the sounds in Pandora reflected, or, and vice versa, the sounds that you would see and not the sounds you would see, the sounds that you would hear.

Tim Foster:
I.

Lou Mongello:
While you're watching the Avatar films, it's.

Tim Foster:
So the reason I had a question mark on mine, I had, you know, ambient noises in the lands as kind of a catch all. And actually the first thing I thought of were the drums you hear in Adventureland. But I didn't know if you would disqualify that as part of the music of the area, but it did quickly, I went to Galaxy's edge in Pandora, wrote them both down, and then I put question marks behind them because this is a testament, I guess, to how well this is done. Because to me, I have not had the privilege of being there without a thousand of my closest friends right beside me. So both of them came to mind. I'm like, yeah, I hear things. Wait, I've heard things, right? Isn't that right? I've heard things there. Well, I was sure there were, but then part of me was like, I don't know how much I'm hearing or how much my mind is filling in the blanks.

Lou Mongello:
It's the heat, just because of how well.

Tim Foster:
Or the heat, but just. It just kind of just goes to how incredibly detailed both of those lands are on every level, from the ground you're walking on to the cast members and the roles they're playing, to the sounds, to the point where that's how well themed they are to me, because I really find it hard to kind of tell difference between what's. I mean, I know what's real. Not real, but really. But it's so well done and so immersive that I start questioning. I, like, I don't know if I'm hearing all these sounds or maybe something I'm kind of filling in my own head to complete the picture. But yes, somewhere there so I can take the question mark off.

Lou Mongello:
I think what you just said would make the sound designers very happy because specifically, places like Pandora, it's a combination, right? The. The wildlife sounds there were created using a blend of. Of imaginative sound design on, you know, digital instruments and real animal recordings to make sure that the sounds you hear are both believable and fantastical. Right. So it sort of fits this alien environment. Plus they change from day to night, so the sounds you hear in the daytime are different than the sounds you hear at night. And we'll have to go do this together. Do you know that you can trigger, I guess, can trigger certain sound effects? There's like, hidden audio effects you can trigger by touching certain plants that.

Lou Mongello:
So there's a. There's this responsiveness that they have that you obviously don't get on earth, but you do get in Pandora, so especially, like, as you cross that bridge and there's a giant plant there.

Tim Foster:
If you touch everything now, I mean.

Lou Mongello:
Well, not within re. Yeah. So, yeah, the. The background and environmental sounds, I felt bare mentioned.

Tim Foster:
I love that. Well, hey. Well, top ten, lu. I mean, that's ten.

Lou Mongello:
What are we doing that ten. All right, if that's ten.

Tim Foster:
I mean, I'm not like, yeah, I have like, I still have like twelve.

Lou Mongello:
All right, so do we do. All right, give me one more and then we'll do a relatively quickish honorable, because I guarantee, like if we were to be like, okay, we're done right here. Scream, oh, flames from the side of faces. Because there's ones like, people don't. How have you not mentioned this most obvious sound?

Tim Foster:
All right, I, well, I have a lot of obvious sounds. I'll save them. So I'm gonna save my big, I think the go with me here on my list. I just gotta save it for a standalone here. One of my favorite sounds at Walt Disney world is no sound at all. Timmy Foster, you're very upset. I can see it. Cameras on, I can see.

Lou Mongello:
I'm not, it's the sound of, I mean, I'm giving you like I'm hugging you because I'm like, look at you.

Tim Foster:
Well, I now whether I'm going the same place you're thinking of. So when I say that, I'm thinking in terms of when you're outside the parks, at the resorts, there's one spot in particular I always think of, and this is over at the wilderness lodge. Two places, whether you're at the dock and it's in the morning or it's late at night. The other place when you used to be able to, and I used to do this walk all the time, take the trail between wilderness lodge and Fort Wilderness, that walking trail, just being there. And there's a few other places on property that'll do this and realizing you're not hearing, you're not hearing the parks, you're not hearing the guests, you're not hearing the rides, you're not hearing the hustle and bustle. It is so peaceful, which is, on one hand, it's really cool knowing that just over there there's thousands of people, but I can't hear them. But I'm still in this magical place. And I think especially on that dock, because you're just looking out the water, the sun's either coming up or going down.

Tim Foster:
It's just an odd thing to experience at Walt Disney World, being in a place where it is so peaceful and tranquil that you don't hear a thing. All you hear is the subtle sounds of nature going on when you can. That gentle wind going across the water and that's it. But if the air is just right, that train whistle will make its way to you, remind you. But it's just having that being able to take that break. And I don't even like to say it like that, just this nice, peaceful oasis in the middle of everything. That's great.

Lou Mongello:
So I love this. And I'm gonna piggyback on this with something a little bit different. But I was trying. I'm actually think I'm gonna sort of combine multiple. I'm gonna piggyback and combine all you do. Because I think they. I think it all. Because you talked about.

Lou Mongello:
I think you prefaced this one by talk about sort of the absence of sound, right. And I think it's. It. It's interesting. And it made me think of something that was on my list, because when it wasn't present, it was very noticeable. Let me explain. One of the things that was on my list is. And the only way I could sort of describe it is the hum of the crowds, right? The background murmur, this murmur of voices and laughter and movement and ambient noises that vary in intensity depending on the time of day and the location in the park.

Lou Mongello:
There's a vibrancy there, there's an excitement, there's an energy that comes with it. It's laughter, it's joy, it's cheers. It might be a scream from a coaster. Look at me squeezing that one in. And the reason why I mentioned it is because when it wasn't there, it was noticeable and almost bothersome. What I mean by that is when in the immediacy, after the sort of the quote unquote post Covid world and the parks were reopened again, there was this. It's funny, friends of mine who are local, we sometimes joke about, oh, the days right after Covid, because you could go to the parks and it was empty and you felt like you had the park to yourself, because you. For all intents and purposes, you did.

Lou Mongello:
Things were different. It wasn't the same. Understand, go with me here. As Tim Foster would say, the parks were empty and you could sort of move about freely, you could ride attractions. There were no weights or all these different things. And the thing that was missing was the murmur, was the hum of the crowds. So in one respect, there was a. It was almost like they turned the volume up to eleven for background music, because you could hear it more distinctly, you could hear it clearly, you could hear it in different sections of the park, that it would get drowned out by the hum.

Lou Mongello:
But that hum, for me personally, was missing. I missed the sound of the crowds. And I remember, like, being there a couple times and it made me sad because I was like, you don't know what you got till it's gone. So crowds is sort of the double edged sword. We don't want a lot to be a lot of crowds because we want the ability to walk on. But I did. I sort of missed that sound because the other thing that was on my list, and I'm like, do I even mention this? Or is Tim gonna laugh at me that I'm, like, super sappy and emotional and going through menopause or something? But the sound of. And I'm gonna get choked up on this because I have kids who aren't kids anymore.

Lou Mongello:
But the sound of laughter of children, like, that innocent, beautiful, joyful laughter of kids, it's the heart of the Disney experience. It's the soul of going to Disney World. That warmth, that magic, that happiness that, you know, again, it's a family. It's what want a place for families to come together. And, like, that's it. Like, that is the thing. So I missed the hum of the crowds. Yes.

Lou Mongello:
Maybe the screaming on the coasters in the background, but it's like that laughter of kids that. That helps to punctuate that. And when I see that sometimes and I watch, not in a weird, like, I watch families, and I see kids wide eyed and just that they have that, like, joyous belly laughter, I'm like, that's it, man. Like, that's why I moved here. That's why I do this. Like, that's the sound. Like, that I love. And of all the sounds that we talked about, like, that's the one that matters most.

Lou Mongello:
I'm gonna go hug my son. He's 18.

Tim Foster:
Okay. He's gonna use here, buddy. No, I love that answer. I feel like it's anticlimactic. That followed up with a bunch of dumb sounds. I know.

Lou Mongello:
I didn't mean to sort of get, you know, but I mean, it's like.

Tim Foster:
That's like a mic drop answer, right?

Lou Mongello:
Well, it's. But it's true. And then I. And I think you talk about the absence of sound. I felt like this was just the time, you know, this was the time to mention it there. So. Yeah. So.

Tim Foster:
Well, show host, what do we do now? All right, go.

Lou Mongello:
Go with me. Go. Let me go with you, Tim, and go through some. Or all of your honorable mentions, and we can.

Tim Foster:
Oh, my God. And then I left these. These are all pretty much, I think, very, very specific single sound. So this. This wasn't a big moment, but, oh, randomly. The Space Rangers spin buzzer, attentional. That one. I'm there.

Lou Mongello:
I had the key. No, wait, don't. Wait. Don't go too fast, because I had the cue. There's something. There's that. There's the sounds of the queue in buzz. Without, like, the specific narrations.

Tim Foster:
Without the narration. Yeah. Right. Yeah.

Lou Mongello:
But that. That. There's this cool playfulness and sort of music and, you know, hearing buzz in the background and the mechanical almost escalated. Sounds of, like, the movement of toys is prevalent because of being shrunk down. So I love the fact that you had that, because I had it on my list as well.

Tim Foster:
I had. In Philharm magic. I think I mentioned this a million times on your show, but the scene when you go into the Aladdin scene and you're lifting above the clouds and there's just this almost imperceptible as you come up. And I even stopped to make sure. I don't know if I'm hearing it. I have heard. I am hearing it, but for a while, I wasn't if I was hearing it or making it up in my mind as part of the thing. But that one always sticks with me and takes me in Felhar magic to the next level of.

Tim Foster:
This is the most magical movie I've ever seen. This was a big one, actually. This next one, Epcot sounds. Specific. Epcot sounds where, you know, you're an epcot. The sound of the cars coming around on test track, which you can hear all throughout the park.

Lou Mongello:
Nice one.

Tim Foster:
That's. Man, I know. I'm hearing. That's such an epcot sound.

Lou Mongello:
That isn't epcot. That's a good.

Tim Foster:
The. Let's see. This might be one. If people out there are screaming. Why didn't you say?

Lou Mongello:
I'm staring at it on my list and I'm like, is he really not going to mention. I'm assuming this is where you're going.

Tim Foster:
So I don't know. The one I'm thinking of is the opening and closing of the monorail.

Lou Mongello:
Yeah, man. Where's the ding ding? In the monorail? Where's the doors?

Tim Foster:
In the monorail? Yeah, that's a. That's a huge one. It was. Anything about the monorail? Because we said no narration. Because that's usually the thing I go to audio wise and the monorail. But. Yeah, those doors.

Lou Mongello:
But I think that there's. I think there's multiple monorail sounds, right?

Tim Foster:
Yeah.

Lou Mongello:
Ding, ding, ding, ding.

Tim Foster:
Yep.

Lou Mongello:
There's a sound of the door, I think. And when I was told about this. You're too young to remember this. Do you remember the extinct sound of the manual doors being closed in the early days, they used the cast members. You have to go and physically close each doors. And there was this mechanical, like, clunk sound from the door mechanism. You don't remember this?

Tim Foster:
No, Tim.

Lou Mongello:
Like, I can see it. I can hear it as the cast members would walk down and shut each individual door. Like, I wish I could sort of describe the sound. Like I. It's like a taste, like, it's like a taste in. In my mind's like ears that I can. That I can hear so distinctly. Like, you want to talk about a.

Lou Mongello:
Like a God. This is, you know, it's a 40 year old memory of a sound of the door closing. Quick aside. You, my friend, who is listening, if you get this, please don't leave me hanging out here by myself feeling like I'm the only one who remembers. Like, yes, there's the sound of the motors and there's the sound of the dings, but I remember not just the sounds of the current doors closing and that almost that pneumatic sound, but the physical sound of the cast members closing and locking each individual door. I don't email me, call the voicemail post on social. Just reassuring. I see you.

Lou Mongello:
I see you. 407-900-9391 I know I'm a crazy person, but please don't let me feel like I'm the only person.

Tim Foster:
Doesn't mean you didn't hear it, though. So those two aren't mutually exclusive. So other things. Oh, this is a fair in the queue. This is what I always forget about in the queue of pirates. I guess when you're approaching the loading area, there's a part where you can listen and you can hear pirates digging. Yes. In.

Tim Foster:
In the little alcove.

Lou Mongello:
If you listen on the right hand side. If you're on the right hand side of the queue, that's where you hear him digging.

Tim Foster:
Yeah. Very, very cool. This is a favorite.

Lou Mongello:
Wait, state. Wait, stay. Or pirates. Let's hang a pirate.

Tim Foster:
That's the only pirates one I have. So if you.

Lou Mongello:
I had a double whammy because I had. The first thing I thought of was the. Was the cannons. The sound of the cannons battle. Right. Very sort of distinctive sounds. But Tim, I don't know why I love this sound so much. I love the sounds of the seagulls when you're going through the first area.

Lou Mongello:
Right. Sort of before you go back in time and the pirates are on the beach, or the skeletons. The pirates are on the beach in those coastal and harbor areas. I don't know what it is, but it's. It's something that's this childhood memory that brings up. And there's something wonderfully comfortable and comforting about the sound of the seagulls.

Tim Foster:
I like it. Well, here, I'll take you back again. Let's go to. Let's go to front. Right up the road to frontierland. Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. And the opening sequence where you're in the caverns and you're climbing up the hill and the water is pouring down and you hear the. The click, click of.

Tim Foster:
As you're going up the hill and how it echoes so much in that. In that room is so.

Lou Mongello:
There's a tension, right? There's a tension to it.

Tim Foster:
Like the railroad.

Lou Mongello:
There's a little bit of, like, fear, like, oh, what if. Like, the trip. Yeah, I had it. I had the railroad change as you go up the lift hills as well.

Tim Foster:
I had going over to Epcot in the Japan pavilion. I have one in the Japan pavilion in the gardens. The. I don't know the technical name for this thing. The bamboo water hammer gizmo in the garden that I've seen. Japanese word.

Lou Mongello:
Japanese word is gizmo.

Tim Foster:
Okay. No, I've seen it called a deer hammer or something like that. But if you don't know, it's the thing where it fills up with water and it slides down. When the water comes out, it comes back up with a clunk. You know, a bamboo clunk. It's a small, little, tiny sound, but it's so. Just reminds me of the Japan pavilion so much. I even want to get one of those and put it in my garden at home.

Tim Foster:
The other one I had. Oh. In living with the land, the environmental sounds in the early portion of the attraction, the rain and the barnyard sounds in the barn scene, the roosters clucking the chickens.

Lou Mongello:
Tim, when you go in that attraction.

Tim Foster:
Listen to the land. Hey, that's what it was.

Lou Mongello:
Nature's plan will shine above. Let's listen to the land.

Tim Foster:
There you go.

Lou Mongello:
Listen to the land.

Tim Foster:
Right next door, I'm guessing boeing around epcot. A very specific sound. The crashing waves in front of the seas with Nemo and friends and the seagulls going, mine, mine, mine. We have a joke where we think we should take a poll. It'd be like a game you could play with your family. Once you go through the attraction, you come out, especially with your kids. What are they saying more? Are the kids going, mine, mine, mine? Or are they going, dude, righteous. Like, what are they doing?

Lou Mongello:
More?

Tim Foster:
I think it's a fun game we can all play because, I don't know, this was a throwback. Remember that old party line phone in Le Chapeau? Stop on Main street, USA to pick it up and actually hear a phone call conversation. And then I'll end on Main street, USA, kind of where we started. This is always a favorite. I love pointing this out to people. I guess there's music involved, but go with me here. It's the singing lessons window at the crossroads where if you just sit there and you'll hear it, it's somebody giving very badly needed music voice lessons to somebody singing. And you can hear it coming out the window just like this was happening in any town.

Tim Foster:
USA. And it's just. I love it because it's just one of those weird details. It seems like there's a lot of effort to make that happen, and there it is. And most people don't notice it. First of all, it's tucked out of the way on that side street, and if you're just walking down, you're not going to notice it. But it just reminds me, man, that attention to Disney detail that they have is incredible. So that was the last one I had on my list, so I thought we'd bring it back to Main Street, USA from whence we started.

Lou Mongello:
Nice. I will try and do the same. I had one that I, like, I put on. I took off my list. I ended up leaving it off. But I'll mention it anyway because I think technically, by the rules, that I'm sort of making up as we go along. There's no other word. The star tours dings, right? Yeah, I think it's.

Lou Mongello:
It's melodic enough that it really almost counts as music.

Tim Foster:
Nah, but.

Lou Mongello:
But we know it, right? You know it. And it's one of those things that, you know, even if you just sort of. Yeah, it's on my list, but it's off my list, so. But I had. We're making up the rules as we.

Tim Foster:
Go counts as much as the chimes on the TTA do. So that's why I'm gonna let you have it.

Lou Mongello:
I didn't feel that Disney's animal kingdom got enough love and. Yeah, no, listen, my. My man, I know you haven't been the same for a number of years, but the roar of the Yeti, right, Tim, I know you've never actually been on expedition Everest, but there's a huge yeti.

Tim Foster:
I had my ears covered, so I didn't hear it's.

Lou Mongello:
Again, it's that same and you hear it you don't sort of hear it outside, but you hear the screams. But as you go through, there's the sound of that yeti that invokes a sense of fear and excitement and there's awe. Even though he's sort of in b mode when you see the yeti. I also thought, I'm gonna go back to Magic Kingdom. And I thought of the jungle cruise. And yes, on one hand, it's where the background sounds of the jungle, but there's something, like, wonderfully comfortable about the sounds of the engines of the jungle cruise. And I don't know, sort of how to describe it, but when you get in and you feel like you're on this, like, old working sort of steam engine boat, and the sound of those engines as they ply the waterways of adventureland, I dig that, too. And what I think is, I think this is the one that I'm going to end on because I'm sure that at least one person is yelling, going, you, you two, you end this without mentioning this, and I'm never listening again.

Lou Mongello:
How did we not mention one of the most important sounds? I'm serious. It's the one of the most important because without this sound, you don't have the experience. Little Timmy Foster the sound of the magic band chime at the entrance to each of the parks. Like, how do we not do this, right?

Tim Foster:
I don't know what's wrong.

Lou Mongello:
Happiness and excitement and the scent of welcome, but, like, it's very distinctive, right? This. This ding or chime that. That also is not singular, right. They have sort of special chimes for different bands, different times for different events and times of years. But this is it, man. This is like the start of your day in the park. Like, that is sort of like the reward, right? So it's recognizable. It's nostalgic.

Lou Mongello:
It's associated with the anticipation of creating a new adventures. Like, it's such. It's such a positive tone. Like, there's no. Except if you get the want. Want. Like when it goes green, you get that, like, reassurance and that welcome and anticipation and like you're ready. Like you're ready to start your day.

Lou Mongello:
So I think it's. It's. It's important that you hear it. I think it signifies so much when you go. And I don't want to end on a downer, right? But there's one sound that I don't like in Walt Disney world. There's one time I don't like. It makes me sad. And the worst sound in Walt Disney world.

Lou Mongello:
And I'm going to explain what I mean by this is crying kids. And before you're like, wait, he criticizes Becky for this. I don't mean screaming babies. When I hear and see kids that are sad, like, sad that they have to leave or say that they can't get the souvenir, or sad, it breaks my heart. Like, nobody should cry in Walt Disney World. Like, there's times I've seen, like, you know, a kid might ask for something and their parents, like, no, whatever. Some parents are a little bit more, you know, abrupt than others, and that's fine. And I would be like, no, honey, it's okay.

Lou Mongello:
Like, I'll buy it for you. Like, I feel soap. Like, I never want to see or hear the sound of somebody. You can cry for joy. You can cry of, you know, of sentiment, but there's, there's nothing. Like, nobody should be sad crying in Walt Disney world ever.

Tim Foster:
Aw, see, that's nice, though. I thought you were going to say that your most feared sound in Walt Disney world was little Timmy Foster behind you. Wait for me. Not knowing I'm there.

Lou Mongello:
Thoughts?

Tim Foster:
That's what you were going to say.

Lou Mongello:
Listen, one of my, the sounds I'm looking forward to most, Timmy Foster, is the next time you and I are in the parks together, and I want to hear the sound of the joy and the laughter in your voice, because that's what this is all about, right? It's why we love this place. It's the way it makes us feel, because these sounds are so important to us. Like, if you get it, you get it. Like, the things that we're talking about might make no sense to some people who don't understand this Disney thing that we love so much. But if you know, you know. And I'm, I hope that as we went through this list, you who's listening at home, in the car, on the treadmill, wherever you are, I hope that at least one of these put a smile on your face and, like, you found yourself nodding in agreement or yelling at your, your phone that we missed one. Either way, I would love, love, love to hear from you again. You can, you can comment in the clubhouse@www.com.

Lou Mongello:
clubhouse. You can email me, but I would love to hear it, right? Because there's, the reason why I love podcasting is because there's so much power and sound in the spoken word. Call the voicemail. 407-900-9391 407 900 wdw one. Tell me what your favorite, most iconic sound is. Tell me one that we missed that should have been on the list. Tell me how these sounds make you feel. Share a memory, whatever it is, and I will play it on the air on an upcoming show.

Lou Mongello:
The other sound that I love so much, little Timmy Foster, is when the mailman comes and knocks on my door and says, louise, the latest issue of Celebrations magazine, or more importantly, the latest special edition celebrations book, is here in your inbox or your mailbox. That is a sound that. That I can really get behind and truly love. It doesn't happen as often as I want because you normally don't send me all the things. But it's fine. It's okay. I'm not hurt.

Tim Foster:
I try. I have a burning question, though. Does your mailman really come up to the door and knock on your door to give you.

Lou Mongello:
It's a metaphor. It's an analogy for, you know, the story I was trying to tell males in like, no.

Tim Foster:
Here. Perfect opportunity. I had one more entry on my list and I disqualified it because it's music. But did you know? I know. You know, but that in journey into imagination with figment, when you go into the sound lab and you're having your hearing tested with a series of tones, did you know that those first few tones are actually the opening notes of one little spark by the Sherman brothers?

Lou Mongello:
Stop it.

Tim Foster:
Transpose down if you tones. But there you go.

Lou Mongello:
See, this is the kind of stuff that you don't normally get from Tim. So this is actually pretty amazing.

Tim Foster:
You don't get this. That's just one of the little nuggets of wisdom we have now. We have a new, a brand new book coming out soon. This is our first of many, we hope, in new series, definitive guides. This is journey into imagination. And we're excited about this one. This is a big coffee table book. This isn't a little tiny paperback.

Tim Foster:
This is a big book, 150 something pages. And it goes into everything. It's not just a picture book. This is a story of the history of the traction from concept through construction, walkthroughs of every version. All the image works in the magic eye theater, the characters, dream finder figment, the vehicles, the gardens, everything. It was so fun to put together. I learned so much by putting it together. It's full of all kinds of photographs and illustrations that I did of all the floor plans and the turntable and the dream catcher ship that I call it.

Tim Foster:
So comes with a free pin, like all of our other books have in the past. But that's up for pre sale now. That will be shipping in a month or so, but it is up for sale@celebrationspress.com. so we're very excited about it. You can get a sneak peek at all the goodies that are inside on the website. Lou, I sent you a version of it, which you'll hopefully look at soon. But I, listen, I'm very excited about this.

Lou Mongello:
I'm very great. First of all, I'm very excited for this. Like, all kidding aside, like, I love this attraction. You know, I am like a researcher and I love the history, and I'm a completist when it comes to, like, I'm looking at my shelf, looking at the spot that I would love to go right there. This book. I mean, I can't put the PDF there. So this is a nice, subtle hint that I would really love. I'll order it.

Lou Mongello:
It's fine. I know you have.

Tim Foster:
And to be straight, this isn't a digital book. This is a real book. A real book you put on your coffee table with it.

Lou Mongello:
And that's exactly where I was. Love to. Maybe I'll buy two. Maybe I'll buy two and give one away. Not so subtle hint.

Tim Foster:
Oh, you don't buy one. We'll give one away, you and me. We'll do some shows. We'll give some away when they come in.

Lou Mongello:
I would love that. I would love that. I have seen the PDF imagination look like the very, I've told the story a thousand times. I don't care. I'm going to tell 1001 the very first time I saw you, little Timmy Foster, with that spiral bound guide to the magic book. There is no other book, period. No other book or books in the, in, in that talk about Disney and talk about the parks that look and feel physically and in, in terms of the content inside, the way the celebrations press books do, they are not just magazines. They are collectible souvenir books.

Lou Mongello:
And the hardbound books that you do, like this, are absolutely spectacular. And I'm not saying that because I want you to send me to. I'm saying that because I love it and I love you and I love the stuff that you do.

Tim Foster:
All right, I'll send you two, since you asked nicely.

Lou Mongello:
Yay.

Tim Foster:
I still have that spiral bound guide to the magic book in my, in my shelf.

Lou Mongello:
I still, I'm not kidding. They're sitting here on my shelves. I have all of them.

Tim Foster:
I have no, I have the one I brought in my, walking in the, in the, in the unit, the hall with the little mock up, that big thing. I still have.

Lou Mongello:
I'm gonna do my Indiana Jones impression. It belongs in a museum.

Tim Foster:
Well, there you go.

Lou Mongello:
That hermetically seal that thing. I will just say you can do with this information what you like. My son is a huge fan. When he was a little baby, I literally had a dvd, right? Shows how old. I had a dvd with all three versions of journey into imagination because I raised him right. He only loved the first one, but he still has a figment plush, like his original figment plush, his room. So if I have to buy three, if you want to send me three, that's fine, too. So Nicholas has one, too.

Lou Mongello:
His birthday is next week, just so you know. Also.

Tim Foster:
All right.

Lou Mongello:
And people can find any and all of these and all the other good stuff that you do over@celebrationspress.com. i will, of course, link to it in the show notes. You can also find celebrations press on all of the socials. And if you let's stay at home, have an idea for a top ten that you'd love us to do together. Maybe you want to join us in a top ten, email me, share it on social, post it in the clubhouse, and we will add it to the ever growing list of top ten ideas. Timmy Foster. The only other sound that I don't want to hear is the sound that I heard quite often growing up is the sound of the phone being hung up on me. But metaphorically speaking, I hate the sound of the shows having to come to an end.

Lou Mongello:
But I appreciate you, brother. This, as always, was a ton of fun.

Tim Foster:
Yep, we'll do more. Listen up.

Lou Mongello:
All time favorite sound of Walters will go right now. One sound.

Tim Foster:
What? What?

Lou Mongello:
All time favorite sound in Walt Disney World.

Tim Foster:
TTA. Bing, bing, bing, bing, bing.

Lou Mongello:
Do you have any?

Tim Foster:
I started with it. I'm gonna end with it.

Lou Mongello:
Do you have any sounds on your phone? Like ringtones?

Tim Foster:
Oh, no. Although a friend of mine had had that as the ringtone and they tried to play.

Lou Mongello:
I haven't. I have it as a text. Oh, I think it's for my mom.

Tim Foster:
Yeah, I was gonna try and do that. I don't know how this phone thing works. You'll have to show me how to make that. What?


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